Best Diet for Pilots?

Are there any publish peer reviewed studies that show any benefit to these supplements? Specifically what are you taking?
If so(and I'd like to read them), what is the mechanism of action?
Who knows? But I'd bet good money they're distributed out of Utah.
 

AAPalmTree

Well-Known Member
I lost 50 lbs over two years. 5'9". I was 195 now I'm 145.

Bring almost all my own food. Don't count calories but am aware of what I eat. When eating out I traditionally get a turkey burger with salad and balsamic vinaigrette dressing. On a 4-day now and I won't buy a thing out.

Exercise is important when losing weight. Do weights skip a day do cardio. Hard cardio not this walk for an hour stuff. 20-30 mins is all you need. Aim to burn around 500 cal.

I don't do low carb but have reduced the carbs that I eat. IE don't eat all pasta. At home we will have wheat pasta but cook broccoli/zucchini/tomatoes and put it in the pasta as a "filler". Normal serving of pasta is 56 grams, aim for around 45, then fill with veggies.

I have a sweet tooth, that is my downfall, but it can still be done even while eating sweets. Everything in moderation.

Low carb is no way to live. Your body needs carbs. It's energy. I suppose it's fine for a short time period. But sustainable long term? Personally I don't consume alcohol.

Just had my blood pressure two days ago. 98/59 heartrate 51. Cholesterol 124. I eat a dozen eggs a week!
That’s awesome. What do you pack for the road?
 

texas_pilot

Well-Known Member
Here are the big changes I made. Do them in order, as you may find it difficult to do all at the same time. Shoot for 80% compliance.
1. Cut out sugar. I do enjoy the occasional soda or ice cream cone here or there, but it's only as a treat, and maybe once a week. Hell, I don't even put sugar in my coffee.
2. Cut out dairy. Really, cow's milk doesn't provide the nutrition to humans that it does baby calfs. It contains a lot of unnecessary calories, and for men, there's a pretty strong link between caseins and prostate cancer.
3. Cut out refined carbohydrates. These have the tendency, just like sugar, to spike your insulin levels. Bad juju for weight loss, bad juju for the potential for diabetes, and bad juju for cardiovascular health. Cut out bread, cut out pasta (I know pasta is tough to do... I love pasta. Change it out for spaghetti squash). Stop eating wheat thins because they're "low fat."
4. More plant-based meals. As part of #3, my dinner sides are usually something like kale and acorn squash. Those take up 2/3rds or more of my plate, with meat being the smallest portion. In fact, I'm trying to cut even that back and add more veggies. Opt for a big salad for a meal (with healthy dressing) when you can. Leafy green veggies are best.
5. Drink water, tea, or black coffee. Lots of calories and sugars in other types of drinks. I guess some people would say to cut out coffee too, but we're pilots; it'll never happen. :)
1, 2, 3, and 5 are easy to accomplish on the road, assuming you're shooting for 80% compliance. They really are. #4 is a bit trickier, particularly with meals served on the jet, but do your best.
Using the above, I've been able to maintain 190 lbs (I'm 6'0) without really trying, and I previously always had big weight fluctuations (at one point I weighed 240 lbs). Also, at my last *real* physical, my LDL cholesterol was 105, with an HDL (the good cholesterol) of 74. Triglycerides were a gentleman's 37 (<150 is normal). :)
It can be done, fellas. Make some adjustments, and stop counting calories or starving yourself (you'll never stick with it). Eat until you're full, but eat the right things. Don't think of it as a "diet," think of it as "This is how I eat now."
 

Akutan

Well-Known Member
Are there any publish peer reviewed studies that show any benefit to these supplements? Specifically what are you taking?
If so(and I'd like to read them), what is the mechanism of action?
Not really, but there are studies that show supplements doing harm. And there are court cases that show that many supplements are not as what is advertised. Dr. M. Greger has it summarized in his meta-analysis book entitled, "How Not To Die." In conclusion, you should exercise, but not too much. And eat, mostly plants. Your telomeres will thank you.
 

z987k

Well-Known Member
Not really, but there are studies that show supplements doing harm. And there are court cases that show that many supplements are not as what is advertised. Dr. M. Greger has it summarized in his meta-analysis book entitled, "How Not To Die." In conclusion, you should exercise, but not too much. And eat, mostly plants. Your telomeres will thank you.
I'm quite aware. That's why I asked the question.

People make claims based on anecdotes or n=1 with no control and it's the best thing ever. All you have to do is ask for any evidence at all and it's virtually always, oh, um, but my anecdotes!

And if there is evidence, I would genuinely love to read it!
 

Lawman

Well-Known Member
Best diet for pilots, hands down, is the keto diet.
Keto is a medical treatment program mixed with an eating disorder masked as a “diet.”

Do you know the origin of that program? It’s designed around use with children who are epilepsy patients because by putting them on the diet it requires less total dosage of drugs to achieve stabilizing effect.

It was adopted as a supplemental by the body building world as a method of “shrink wrapping” during the cut phase for photo shoots/competition.

It was never intended as a permanent dietary program for adults. Hence why dietitians who know better will warn you of all the side effects common to it (low energy and lethargy/irritability/etc).




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Lawman

Well-Known Member
Not really, but there are studies that show supplements doing harm. And there are court cases that show that many supplements are not as what is advertised. Dr. M. Greger has it summarized in his meta-analysis book entitled, "How Not To Die." In conclusion, you should exercise, but not too much. And eat, mostly plants. Your telomeres will thank you.
If you look at any work out or fitness supplement marked nutritional facts you’ll notice something... most of them don’t use the word Nutrition.

If they did they would be regulated by the FDA. By claiming supplements they could literally put powdered drywall and sugar in a container and say it’s whatever they want. That’s how NoExplode ended up banned in a lot of places. People died.


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z987k

Well-Known Member
You know, I’m not the one throw that term lightly. I wasn’t aware of any scabbing at ATI. Do you have pics or news media evidence of this? Was it a real strike and a real picket line? And that line was crossed? By who and how many?
It was ruled an illegal strike.

But every airline has a nickname and ATI is scab air. Everyone knows who you're talking about. Just like Southernjets on here or Air Beachball or the Eskimo.
 

Cherokee_Cruiser

Well-Known Member
Yeah I’m sorry but I agree with the above post. Either it’s a legal strike or not. Scab is a serious term and should not be used lightly. Nicknames should reflect some semblance of reality. I get Southern Jets, Air Beach Ball, and Eskimo. But until Jdean posted about going to a certain carrier, that was the first I heard about “don’t go to scab” and “don’t cross the line.” So no, I didn’t know about the nickname.


I googled ATI illegal strike and this cane up:


That’s kinda shocking. Another company named ATI had an illegal strike. What are the chances?
 

killbilly

Vocals, Lyrics, Triangle, Washboard, Kittens
Keto is a medical treatment program mixed with an eating disorder masked as a “diet.”

Do you know the origin of that program? It’s designed around use with children who are epilepsy patients because by putting them on the diet it requires less total dosage of drugs to achieve stabilizing effect.

It was adopted as a supplemental by the body building world as a method of “shrink wrapping” during the cut phase for photo shoots/competition.

It was never intended as a permanent dietary program for adults. Hence why dietitians who know better will warn you of all the side effects common to it (low energy and lethargy/irritability/etc).




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Glad you posted this.


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