Backup plans?

charlieoscar

New Member
With the impending furloughs, what is everyone's backup plan when the bloodshed begins? I'm almost certain I'm getting the boot come October, so I'm looking for ideas. What else can a dispatch cert. get you? Does dispatch experience hold any value in any other industry? Please calm me down! :biggrin:
 

ATLiens

Well-Known Member
With the impending furloughs, what is everyone's backup plan when the bloodshed begins? I'm almost certain I'm getting the boot come October, so I'm looking for ideas. What else can a dispatch cert. get you? Does dispatch experience hold any value in any other industry? Please calm me down! :biggrin:
Train dispatch jobs pay well and seem to still be hiring but I’ve heard the QOL is pretty terrible.
 

fsxflyhigh

Well-Known Member
Train dispatch jobs pay well and seem to still be hiring but I’ve heard the QOL is pretty terrible.
At least train dispatchers have better QOL then train crew. Not to mention that railroad retirement seems pretty decent. Although I heard Union Pacific RR up in Omaha recently furloughed 100 dispatchers back in March after combining sectors. Soo there goes my plan A...

The big question is how willing are people going to be to move for different jobs. There are still several 135/91 operators that need flight coordinators in places you never thought of living. I'm sure they are going to get a lot of resumes though coming October. I'm looking at probably either falling back to my fancy degree in atmospheric/environmental science, or I honestly wouldn't mind passenger railroad conductor (Not as bad of QOL as freight). To think that I turned down a comfy state government air quality job last year to play airline dispatcher. Woops!
 

mrezee

Living the dream!
Train dispatch jobs pay well and seem to still be hiring but I’ve heard the QOL is pretty terrible.
One of the managers at my last airline did that for a while, he said the same thing. Completely different from airline dispatch. He hated it.
 

manniax

Well-met in the Ka-tet
One of the managers at my last airline did that for a while, he said the same thing. Completely different from airline dispatch. He hated it.
Someone in the class ahead of me did that for several years, but evidently didn't like it because he got rehired back in my shop a couple of years ago. I think that with all the pay raises that airline dispatchers got in recent years makes the airline industry a more attractive option now...although the railroad does probably have a better pension than passenger airlines, as @fsxflyhigh mentioned. I had another friend get hired to be a train dispatcher for Amtrak in the Boston area, and she also didn't like it very much - either the schedule (two days off a week, but they were non-consecutive) or the job itself. She never got fully signed off before quitting and finding a different gig.

Another possible job is working as a pipeline controller for oil companies. I know several people left Continental to give that a try, since Houston has a fair number of oil companies headquartered there...some of them liked it very well (and are still doing it) while for others it wasn't their cup of tea and they quit. I don't know what the job entails exactly though.
 

flynryan692

Well-Known Member
IT, specifically as a Network Engineer and trying to focus on network automation. Will do Help Desk stuff for a while if I have to. I'm probably not getting the boot, just a downgrade, but I'm also not really down for full time regional dispatching on indefinite reduced hours either, so deuces. :(
 

Troy McClure

Ah say boy...Whattcha got there son?
Another well paid dispatching job is for the Light Rail or Subway systems. I have seen those advertised many times. The pay is quite good.
 

QXDX

Well-Known Member
A train dispatcher is more akin to an air traffic controller instead of a flight planner. In fact, at least in Canada, the job is referred to as a rail traffic controller. It's a cross between air traffic control, and an airline aircraft router. I'm not familiar with a pipeline controller, but it strikes me as similar to a train dispatcher; get the product where it needs to go.
 

manniax

Well-met in the Ka-tet
A train dispatcher is more akin to an air traffic controller instead of a flight planner. In fact, at least in Canada, the job is referred to as a rail traffic controller. It's a cross between air traffic control, and an airline aircraft router. I'm not familiar with a pipeline controller, but it strikes me as similar to a train dispatcher; get the product where it needs to go.
Yeah I don't know too much of what either job fully involves, not having done either one myself....just sharing information about some other jobs I know that people with airline dispatch experience have gone into. Another possibility - 911 dispatch (I know someone that did this for several years who is a member of this forum) as well as bus or truck dispatching (don't know anyone that has done this personally, but I know bus dispatchers are employed by companies like Greyhound, and I've heard they like seeing an aircraft dispatcher license on your resume for that position.) I've also seen dispatcher positions advertised for public transportation positions (bus system, light rail, etc.) Basically for any "control/command center" type job, flight dispatching experience might make you an attractive candidate for that position....or at least help move your resume to the top of the pile when they are calling people for interviews.
 

ParrotheadJGR11

Existence is pain to a Meeseeks, Jerry.
If it comes down to it.. I'll try something I've never done before.

I've pretty much worked in Aviation since college, with a break where I worked for local government.
 

paincorp

Well-Known Member
Just put your SO to work. As one ex-Continental Dispatcher would say - if my wife would only take that 4th job, my life would be easy.
Not trying to call anyone out, but I always find it funny when people making as much as mainline dispatchers complain about pay. There are so many people making way less than them making it work.

I had someone at a former job, when I was making ~$30k a year, tell me they couldn’t afford to make less than $70k a year, and their husband was still working. If I can make it work for $30k, I’m not sure why you’re struggling in the same area making over $100k combined.
 
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QXDX

Well-Known Member
Not trying to call anyone out, but I always find it funny when people making as much as mainline dispatchers complain about pay. There are so many people making way less than them making it work.

I had someone at a former job, when I was making ~$30k a year, tell me they couldn’t afford to make less than $70k a year, and their husband was still working. If I can make it work for $30k, I’m not sure why you’re struggling in the same area making vet $100k combined.
Get married, buy a house, and have kids, all while saving for retirement, and you'll understand very quickly.
 

flynryan692

Well-Known Member
Not trying to call anyone out, but I always find it funny when people making as much as mainline dispatchers complain about pay. There are so many people making way less than them making it work.

I had someone at a former job, when I was making ~$30k a year, tell me they couldn’t afford to make less than $70k a year, and their husband was still working. If I can make it work for $30k, I’m not sure why you’re struggling in the same area making vet $100k combined.
It pains me to put this out there because I think regional pay needs to increase across the board, but I support my family of 6 (myself, wife, and four kids) on regional pay. It boggles my mind when a single person can't make it work. People are just bad with money.
 

paincorp

Well-Known Member
Get married, buy a house, and have kids, all while saving for retirement, and you'll understand very quickly.
The person that made that comment had no children, and rented an apartment.

If they had children and some big house, I get it, but it’s still something tasteless to say to someone making half of what you do.

Anyways, back to our regularly scheduled programming.
 
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Eskhobbs

Well-Known Member
Not trying to call anyone out, but I always find it funny when people making as much as mainline dispatchers complain about pay. There are so many people making way less than them making it work.

I had someone at a former job, when I was making ~$30k a year, tell me they couldn’t afford to make less than $70k a year, and their husband was still working. If I can make it work for $30k, I’m not sure why you’re struggling in the same area making over $100k combined.
Most of the major SOCs are located in cities that are vastly more expensive than those where regionals/LCCs are located. 30k in indy is a whole lot different than 30k or even 50k in Seattle or Chicago. Still don't know how the folks at QX manage, I moved to Seattle not too long ago and you need to make 70k+ to live somewhat comfortably out here without a roommate.

But again... mo money, mo problems.
 
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