B-17 Crash / Hartford Ct (BDL closed)

chrisreedrules

Master Blaster
CF took me up for a sunset flight in 909 when I was a broke-ass 17-year-old hanging around the ramp at PFN enjoying having a day with one of my favorite planes of all time.

I had been there all day long, talking to people about the plane, telling people about her, answering questions. At the end of the day, I retreated to the fence to watch them start the engines and fly off, but one of the crew came over to me.

“Hey, want to go for a ride?” I still remember his grin.

It was amazing—one of my greatest—and fondest—aviation memories.

After the flight, he gave me a laminated photo of the plane over the statue of liberty. He told me to call them when I got my commercial.

I loved that plane and that organization, and this breaks my heart.
Stories like this are why I still love aviation. It’s a fickle cruel mistress of a career but there is still a spark to be found.
 

MikeD

Administrator
Staff member
I remember this particular plane as one of 6 B-17 forest firebombers operated by Globe Air at FFZ in the early 80s. Sad to see it’s fate and the tragedy for the crew and pax
 

JeppUpdater

Well-Known Member
Rode on it with my wife last year, cruising down the California coast with our heads hanging out the top hatch. Fantastic experience with some wonderful people. Damn shame.
 

ahw01

Well-Known Member
I love these planes and the museums that keep them flying. I wonder about licensing though.


Checking the FAA database. Pilot was B-17 rated. Co pilot not but held an ATP. Flight Engineer is a student pilot/mechanic. How can that work?
 

WacoFan

Bigly
I am not sure the B-17 has a required crew that included the F.E. to fly. I do know that in the days of the old piston liners at TWA at least, F.E. positions were filled by mechanics primarily and other than F.E. rating I am not sure how many of them had pilots licenses.
 

ahw01

Well-Known Member
I am not sure the B-17 has a required crew that included the F.E. to fly. I do know that in the days of the old piston liners at TWA at least, F.E. positions were filled by mechanics primarily and other than F.E. rating I am not sure how many of them had pilots licenses.
Sounds fair but I don't know what exemptions the operation had from the FAA. Vintage FEs can be hard to certify these days but are certainly needed if no.4 lets go which sounds like what happened here.
 

Inverted

The journey is the meat in the goal sandwich
Required crew is one. These airplanes were flown single pilot during their firefighting days.
The FE isn’t a required position either.
Nothing out of the ordinary.
 

ahw01

Well-Known Member
Required crew is one. These airplanes were flown single pilot during their firefighting days.
The FE isn’t a required position either.
Nothing out of the ordinary.
I hope they tighten the regulation in that case
 

Oxman

Well-Known Member

A 75-year-old pilot, his co-pilot and five passengers who were killed in a plane crash Wednesday at Bradley International Airport in Connecticut have been identified.
Authorities on Thursday released a list of the victims, which also include five passengers, a flight engineer and an airport worker who were hurt.
The vintage B-17 aircraft struck a maintenance facility on the runway while trying to return to the airport shortly after take-off.
James Rovella, commissioner of the state Department of Emergency Services and Public Protection, said two of the deceased have yet to be “positively identified" because of their conditions, but their names were included in the list.

Those killed in the crash were identified as:
Pilot Ernest McCauley, 75, of Long Beach, Calif.
Co-pilot Michael Foster, 71, of Jacksonville, Fla.
Passenger David Broderick, 56, of West Springfield, Mass.
Passenger Gary Mazzone, 66, of Broad Brook, Conn.
Passenger James Roberts, 48, Ludlow, Mass.
Passenger Robert Riddell, 59, of East Granby, Conn
Passenger Robert Rubner, 64, of Tolland, Conn.

Those wounded in the crash were:
Flight engineer Mitchell Melton, 34, of Dalehart, Texas
Passenger Andy Barrett, 36, of South Hadley, Mass.
Passenger Linda Schmidt, 62, of Suffield, Conn.
Passenger Tom Schmidt, 62, of Suffield, Conn.
Passenger Joseph Huber, 48, of Tariffville, Conn.
Passenger James Traficante, 54, of Simsbury, Conn.
Airport worker Andrew Sullivan, 28, of Enfield, Conn.
 

Cherokee_Cruiser

Well-Known Member
What’s up with ATC? Sheesh. Pilots say they need a return to the field, the first question should not be “what’s wrong, why do you want to come back?”

If a plane that size and age is requesting a return to field, it’s unlikely they are coming because they forgot the milk and eggs at the airport. Why not say, ok you wanna come back, turn this heading, that altitude. And once the guy seems to be headed back, then ask the reason for the return.
 

Roger Roger

Paid to sleep, fly for fun
What’s up with ATC? Sheesh. Pilots say they need a return to the field, the first question should not be “what’s wrong, why do you want to come back?”

If a plane that size and age is requesting a return to field, it’s unlikely they are coming because they forgot the milk and eggs at the airport. Why not say, ok you wanna come back, turn this heading, that altitude. And once the guy seems to be headed back, then ask the reason for the return.
I would imagine it’s a spring loaded response so they can figure out what they need to do to help.
 
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