ATP and Type Complete

av8or91

Well-Known Member
So as a regional F/O, I'm still a little confused as to how this is going to make the industry more safe. I don't feel like I learned any thing different and the stuff I did in the sim was just about the same as I had done before except the additional stuff required for the ATP.
 

Maurus

The Great Gazoo
It is the stuff you learn outside the airline that will make the difference. People sometimes need to learn stuff the hard way. Having a captain holding a new low time FO's hand through everything could be bad when it is time for the FO to finally upgrade and make PIC decisions.

Who would you rather have in the right seat. Someone with 1000+ hours of PIC decision making or a zero to hero fresh commercial ticket?
 

Crockrocket94

Well-Known Member
From what I've seen hours do not matter, its what you've done with the hours you have that make the difference. I think its more of a weeding out thing than anything.

In my experience a 3000 hr pilot, who has never flown any cabin class twins and generally has most of their hours in single engine VFR day conditions will have a significantly lower experience level than a 1600 hr pilot who has flown CJs and BE99s Single pilot in all weather conditions. Pilot B usually has better command of the aircraft and tends to assist and generally fly better than Pilot A.

At least in my experience. I know it's not the rule, but it's what Ive seen where I work.
 

Maurus

The Great Gazoo
From what I've seen hours do not matter, its what you've done with the hours you have that make the difference. I think its more of a weeding out thing than anything.

In my experience a 3000 hr pilot, who has never flown any cabin class twins and generally has most of their hours in single engine VFR day conditions will have a significantly lower experience level than a 1600 hr pilot who has flown CJs and BE99s Single pilot in all weather conditions. Pilot B usually has better command of the aircraft and tends to assist and generally fly better than Pilot A.

At least in my experience. I know it's not the rule, but it's what Ive seen where I work.
This is true. 1500TT at least makes a candidate have a better chance of having that quality time.
 

jtrain609

I'm a carnal, organic anagram.
It is the stuff you learn outside the airline that will make the difference. People sometimes need to learn stuff the hard way. Having a captain holding a new low time FO's hand through everything could be bad when it is time for the FO to finally upgrade and make PIC decisions.

Who would you rather have in the right seat. Someone with 1000+ hours of PIC decision making or a zero to hero fresh commercial ticket?
Agreed. Regionals have the worst training, wost experience levels in the cockpit, and have the worst performance out of all pilots.

Which is why regional airliners, and not freighters, crash so often.
 

jtrain609

I'm a carnal, organic anagram.
It was dripping with sarcasm. Personally I enjoy bait only lightly buttered and lots and lots of salt.

Sent from my Nexus 7 using Tapatalk 2
It might have been dripping with sarcasm, but it's factually true. I can start posting the NTSB reports if you'd like. For every 3407, there are 5 more freighters that have gone in for similarly stupid reasons.
 

UAL747400

Well-Known Member
It might have been dripping with sarcasm, but it's factually true. I can start posting the NTSB reports if you'd like. For every 3407, there are 5 more freighters that have gone in for similarly stupid reasons.
Indeed, I see guys doing DUMB things all the time!

Corporate aviation still has the best safety record though. HALF the accident rate of 121 carriers. Where do these guys come from? Oh yeah, flight instructing and freight! :D
 

jtrain609

I'm a carnal, organic anagram.
Indeed, I see guys doing DUMB things all the time!

Corporate aviation still has the best safety record though. HALF the accident rate of 121 carriers. Where do these guys come from? Oh yeah, flight instructing and freight! :D
I'm not doubting that. I've flight instructed, worked at a freight company, and now I'm at a regional. The best pilots were at the freight company. But the worst decision makers were also at the freight company. Some guys get into a lot of trouble while single pilot because there's nobody to watch them and make sure they don't do anything TOO stupid.
 

jhugz

#lighttwin Mafia
I'm not doubting that. I've flight instructed, worked at a freight company, and now I'm at a regional. The best pilots were at the freight company. But the worst decision makers were also at the freight company. Some guys get into a lot of trouble while single pilot because there's nobody to watch them and make sure they don't do anything TOO stupid.
Yup, lets 410 it, take off on the wrong runway, or try to power out of a stall. You're right freight guys make the worst decisions.
 

UAL747400

Well-Known Member
I'm not doubting that. I've flight instructed, worked at a freight company, and now I'm at a regional. The best pilots were at the freight company. But the worst decision makers were also at the freight company. Some guys get into a lot of trouble while single pilot because there's nobody to watch them and make sure they don't do anything TOO stupid.
Agreed. Pulling a BS number out of thin air... based on personal observation, at least 30% of the freight guys I encounter either just don't care or don't know what's going on and pull crazy things.
 

Beep

Well-Known Member
I've noticed that in general people flying in a single pilot operation do tend to take more risks than those flying in a " true " crew environment. Also the risks do tend to increase a little bit when you're talking about flying freight single pilot as opposed to passengers. I'm not camping on single pilot ops as I did it myself, all I'm saying is that it can be pretty easy to become trapped in a dangerous state of mind at times.
 
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