Any CL604 pilots

#5
Does any one have the FMS Collins 6000 manual or Desktop Trainer...and CBT.. anything will be very helpfull for me, I will really appreciate if anyone is able to send it to me. I'll start the training of a CL604 next week and any info will be great.

Thanks in advance, and kind regards fromArgentina.

Maria del Cielo Molina
mariadelcielo@molinaycia.com.ar
mariadelcieloo@hotmail.com
Did you ever find a desktop trainer for the CL604? If so do you have a copy that I can use?
 

knot4u

Repeat Offender
#9
I'm aware it's an ancient post. Challengers are just odd, not bad, just odd. I showed up to work one day and there was a Challenger there with no winglets and a flat nose strut, my spidey sense started to tingle. I'd never seen one without winglets and it was, well, odd. As I started formulating a plan to get the nose up high enough to work the strut the pilot showed up, I immediately asked him who stole his winglets and told him that I was going to call the police, the FAA and write a squawk that'd ground his airplane until we'd found and reinstalled them, after we fixed the strut. He was an older gentleman, in recollection he reminded me of a pelican, all grey with an improbably colored nose. He explained to me that he was the original pilot for this particular airframe and his boss was the original owner. Apparently the very early purchasers of the 601 (600?) had a choice to make, more fuel, or winglets. Both ended up giving just about identical range numbers and the owner was a modest man and didn't seem to care about ramp presence. Probably like tip-tanker G-IIs, a lot more fuel with a lot more drag and the numbers end up about the same.
 

SrFnFly227

Well-Known Member
#10
I'm aware it's an ancient post. Challengers are just odd, not bad, just odd. I showed up to work one day and there was a Challenger there with no winglets and a flat nose strut, my spidey sense started to tingle. I'd never seen one without winglets and it was, well, odd. As I started formulating a plan to get the nose up high enough to work the strut the pilot showed up, I immediately asked him who stole his winglets and told him that I was going to call the police, the FAA and write a squawk that'd ground his airplane until we'd found and reinstalled them, after we fixed the strut. He was an older gentleman, in recollection he reminded me of a pelican, all grey with an improbably colored nose. He explained to me that he was the original pilot for this particular airframe and his boss was the original owner. Apparently the very early purchasers of the 601 (600?) had a choice to make, more fuel, or winglets. Both ended up giving just about identical range numbers and the owner was a modest man and didn't seem to care about ramp presence. Probably like tip-tanker G-IIs, a lot more fuel with a lot more drag and the numbers end up about the same.
I’ve never seen one without winglets in person. There’s a documentary about how the plane came to be and all of the video of the test flights show wingletless planes.
 

Cessnaflyer

Wooooooooooooooooooooooooooooooo
#11
I'm aware it's an ancient post. Challengers are just odd, not bad, just odd. I showed up to work one day and there was a Challenger there with no winglets and a flat nose strut, my spidey sense started to tingle. I'd never seen one without winglets and it was, well, odd. As I started formulating a plan to get the nose up high enough to work the strut the pilot showed up, I immediately asked him who stole his winglets and told him that I was going to call the police, the FAA and write a squawk that'd ground his airplane until we'd found and reinstalled them, after we fixed the strut. He was an older gentleman, in recollection he reminded me of a pelican, all grey with an improbably colored nose. He explained to me that he was the original pilot for this particular airframe and his boss was the original owner. Apparently the very early purchasers of the 601 (600?) had a choice to make, more fuel, or winglets. Both ended up giving just about identical range numbers and the owner was a modest man and didn't seem to care about ramp presence. Probably like tip-tanker G-IIs, a lot more fuel with a lot more drag and the numbers end up about the same.
Those early birds were hideous on the ramp.
 

SrFnFly227

Well-Known Member
#16
I literally just saw one down in Buenos Aires on the ramp. Different looking engines too.
Challenger 600 had different engines than all of the other models.

The cowling goes completely around the exhaust and the tail is chopped off. The jet must be much more draggy in this form.
That's a 600. The engines give it away as they are not the CF34s found on every other 600 series Challenger. The 601 was also offered with that tail (as were the RJ 200s). The squared off extended tail was added for the 601-ER. It was kept for the 604 and then rounded off for the 605/650.

That's the video I was thinking of. I enjoyed it when I watched it a few months ago. I do not remember if it mentioned that Fedex was one of the first potential buyers for the plane. They went with Falcon instead, but their interest resulted in a different door design than the standard drop down stairs. My google skills are weak tonight or I'd find a picture.
 

Cessnaflyer

Wooooooooooooooooooooooooooooooo
#17
Challenger 600 had different engines than all of the other models.


That's a 600. The engines give it away as they are not the CF34s found on every other 600 series Challenger. The 601 was also offered with that tail (as were the RJ 200s). The squared off extended tail was added for the 601-ER. It was kept for the 604 and then rounded off for the 605/650.


That's the video I was thinking of. I enjoyed it when I watched it a few months ago. I do not remember if it mentioned that Fedex was one of the first potential buyers for the plane. They went with Falcon instead, but their interest resulted in a different door design than the standard drop down stairs. My google skills are weak tonight or I'd find a picture.
I remember the FedEx Falcons but they have challengers now as corporate aircraft.
 
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