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Any Bones Thrown To Enlisted Aircrew?

Discussion in 'Military Pilots' started by atpduck, Oct 1, 2017.

  1. atpduck

    atpduck Well-Known Member

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    I am getting close to reaching the 1,500 hours I need to take my ATP test. I know that flight engineers get some credit for their flight time as a flight engineer toward meeting the flight experience requirement for the ATP written and practical test. Is there any hope that a person who was an enlisted aircrewman would get some credit for their flight time based on their MOS description?

    I know for a fact that the 2,500 hours I have as a CH-53 Crew Chief has served me well as a pilot. If nothing else I got to spend each flight working as a team with two Naval Aviators. As a 6173/6177 I was an occupational aviator and a required crew member for each flight. I hope that my experience as an Assistant NATOPS Instructor, Weapons and Tactics Instructor, and a Crew Resource Management Facilitator means something to the FAA.

    Would it even be worth my time to try to use my log books and NATOPS training jacket to try to get some credit for my experience?
     
  2. Flyinthrew

    Flyinthrew Well-Known Member

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    Sadly, no. Even the Prowler ECMOs can't really get anything out of their time and they're the closest approximation to a pilot there is in the pantheon of required crew members.

    So that's with the FAA. On your airline apps, it certainly won't hurt that you have things like NATOPS Instructor and CRM Facilitator. I know those are two of the most common credentials I see from successful interview trip reports. They are also fodder for the interview itself.
     
  3. USMCmech

    USMCmech Well-Known Member

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    In the eyes of the FAA, you were merely a passenger.

    In the eyes of any reasonable future employer, you were a valuable part of a flight crew. I would ablsolutely put it on your resume.
     
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  4. fiveninerzero

    fiveninerzero Well-Known Member

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    Networking.
     
  5. atpduck

    atpduck Well-Known Member

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    Thanks for the feedback. When the time comes I will make sure to include my air crew experience in support of my pilot experience.
     
  6. Pilot Fighter

    Pilot Fighter Well-Known Member

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    When I was flying diplomatic/military flights overseas, I would often come across somebody with surprisingly low time. In every case, a guy with prior service (non-pilot) that had networked and interviewed well. For many of those jobs, not being a jerk is the most critical resume item.
     
  7. Flying Saluki

    Flying Saluki Well-Known Member

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    If you're close to 1500 hours, why would you need it? Even if the FAA were willing to credit it, by the time the paperwork was done you'd likely have 1500 hours. How close are you?
     
  8. atpduck

    atpduck Well-Known Member

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    I'm about 200 hours away. At my current job I fly a lot, just not many hours (short legs). 80% of my flights are .9 to 1.1 out and back flights. I usually only get about 30-40 hours a month.
     
  9. Flying Saluki

    Flying Saluki Well-Known Member

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    5 to 6 months sounds like just enough time to prepare for your ATP written and checkride. Then go forth and change the world.
     
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