Antidepressant

Cachon

New Member
Im sure this has being ask before but if anybody knows, please let me know. If someone takes an antidepressant like paxil, will this prevent that person from getting a first class medical. and even if you get it, will the airlines hire you?
 

triplec76

Well-Known Member
I think all antidepressants are a big no no to the FAA, but you should find out for yourself. Here is a link that might answer your questions.

http://www.aviationmedicine.com/index.html

Another thing you should do is call a local aviation medical examiner and get some insight from them. I found a lot of answers to different questions I had from the link I posted above. Hope this helps.
 

SteveC

Really?
Staff member
[ QUOTE ]
Im sure this has being ask before but if anybody knows, please let me know. If someone takes an antidepressant like paxil, will this prevent that person from getting a first class medical. and even if you get it, will the airlines hire you?


[/ QUOTE ]
From the AOPA website:

Amitriptyline (amitriptyline) - NOT ALLOWED - tricyclic antidepressant
Celexa (citalopram) - NOT ALLOWED - SSRI antidepressant
Doxepin (doxepin HCl) - NOT ALLOWED - tricyclic psychotherapeutic agent
Effexor (venlafaxine HCl) - NOT ALLOWED - atypical antidepressant
Lexapro (escitalopram) - NOT ALLOWED - SSRI antidepressant
Paxil (paroxetine HCl) - NOT ALLOWED - SSRI antidepressant
Prozac (fluoxetine HCl) - NOT ALLOWED - atypical antidepressant
Serzone (nefazodone HCl) - NOT ALLOWED - atypical antidepressant
Sinequan (doxepin HCl) - NOT ALLOWED - tricyclic psychotherapeutic agent
Wellbutrin (bupropion) - NOT ALLOWED - antidepressant
Zyban (bupropion) - NOT ALLOWED - antidepressant


Sorry. Looks like no go on antidepressants. But find a local Medical Examiner and ask some questions anyway...
 

PilotGuy37

New Member
All antidepressants are considered disqualifying once their usage is make known to the FAA. If you hold a current medical certificate and begin using antidepressants (or any other medication for that matter), you're required to abide by FAR 61.53, which, as amended August 4, 1997, prohibits the use of medications that makes you unable to meet the requirements for a medical certificate necessary for the pilot operation. Additionally, FAR 91.17 prohibits the use of any drug "that affects the person's faculties in any way contrary to safety". Both these regulations place the burden on the pilot to voluntarily ground him/herself if there is a medical deficiency either because of symptoms or from medication side effects. It's up to you until the FAA is notified, and that happens when you complete your next FAA medical application and list any medications currently being used. If the med(s) is disqualifying, the FAA will notify by way of a denial letter.
 

Cachon

New Member
Thanks everyone. (Disclosure Im not taking any antidepressant) I was just curious because I was reading an article on the NY times website about a girl who commited suicide,
in one of the test lab at an Eli Lilly laboratory while taking antidepressant. and according to the article the girl volunteer for this test and as soon that she stop taking the medication she kill herself.
very sad story
 

aloft

New Member
Antidepressant use might be disqualifying for even a 3rd class medical; read them FARs.
 

flyguy

Well-Known Member
Okay, since I got my medical I've been prescribed medications that I've researeched and found to be NOT disqualifying. I've heard of some people waiting up to a year to get cleared for medications that should not be disqualifying but were put on a backed up waiting list for the FAA to approve. Since I already have a medical, does this mean I may be grounded for up to a year when I go for my next one, even though I know my medications are not disqualifying?
 

tomek_vector

New Member
... not all is lost however. the medical can be reinstated after the meds are discontinued. it takes some hassle and waiting for the wheels of burocracy to move, but it has been done.

i know of one person who had a bout with medical nightmare and following FAA involvement, but it got done. the person is enjoying being in command of a CRJ at a nice regional establishment.

one thing that stuck in my mind from that time is union doctor's advice: 'get well first', deal with the rest later when it comes.

anyway, it sparks memories and my thoughts go out to the person that stuggles with it right now.
 
Top