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NovemberEcho

Dergs favorite member
I've looked at leaving for a couple countries I really like. It's impossible if you want to also work. If you're filthy rich, and can support yourself forever on no income it's easy. I could do it but it would take 10-15 years to recover to what I currently have. Just not really worth it.
when I applied to the FAA I applied to Australia and New Zealand ATC as well.
 

z987k

Well-Known Member
when I applied to the FAA I applied to Australia and New Zealand ATC as well.
Ya, I don't know if I'd actually want to live there forever either, but it'd sure be nice to have the option. Go do it for a few years, if I get bored or don't like it anymore move on, or back or whatever.
I actually am fairly sure I'd not want to live in Oz. Maybe in Tas, but the rest of Australia isn't for me. NZ on the other hand, big fan.
Of course I say the same about everything east of Denver in the US. Ya'll can keep it. I'd rather live in a whole crap ton of places before that half of the US. And one of the things I like about where I live now is we're so removed from the rest of the country. It's almost like we're not part of it.
 

NovemberEcho

Dergs favorite member
Ya, I don't know if I'd actually want to live there forever either, but it'd sure be nice to have the option. Go do it for a few years, if I get bored or don't like it anymore move on, or back or whatever.
I actually am fairly sure I'd not want to live in Oz. Maybe in Tas, but the rest of Australia isn't for me. NZ on the other hand, big fan.
Of course I say the same about everything east of Denver in the US. Ya'll can keep it. I'd rather live in a whole crap ton of places before that half of the US. And one of the things I like about where I live now is we're so removed from the rest of the country. It's almost like we're not part of it.
i did it on a whim. For foreigners the Australian ATC is a 4 year contract. But even they accepted me I don’t know if I’d have done because I don’t think I could have left my dog in quarantine for 6 months.
 

Richman

Well-Known Member
I had the chance to go to NZ for the summer I was a kid. My dad had a business friend down there. Sounds great, huh?

Just to show details are important:

1) Summer here it’s winter there.
2) It was on a sheep farm
3) I was expected work on the farm
4) It wasn’t anywhere near what little population centers NZ has.

Needless to say, I was less than blown away at this “opportunity”.
 

woodreau

Well-Known Member
1. ”Anything worth shooting a missile at is worth shooting two missiles at” is pretty much a rule amongst eastern doctrine air defense training. The actually Probability of intercept would surprise people to see that missile is a good name, because they do miss more than you’d expect. That mantra is of course adopted for use against a defending target (one that can detect and attempt to protect its self) but a gunner isn’t going to differentiate.

2. Unlike you see in movies missiles don’t cause airplanes to just atomize into a giant fireball. They absorb the damage and then like the EP session in the sim from hell, the aircraft becomes a doomed ship. Imagine for instance if simultaneously you lost ever hydraulic and electrical line running along a 6 foot diameter section where your left wing meets the fuselage. Along with that problem, control cables and joints are shattered. Yes you may have something resembling an airplane, but the likelihood that you could keep it flying much less recover it somewhere is now an impossibility.
P(k) out on the ships is also not guaranteed. Normal engagement doctrine is shoot-shoot-look-shoot so 3 SM-2s for each engagement. unfortunately that means we also don’t have a lot of engagement capability (122 or 96 missiles depending on the ship looks like a lot, but most of the missile cells are not dedicated to SMs - instead most of the cells are TLAMs since presidents seem to love lobbing missiles into hostile locations for some reason - keeps the strike planners busy when we keep getting Indigos all the time) when we start running low on SMs, it becomes shoot-look pause shoot-look.

with latest (2005 era) threat weapons we were facing, P(k) was pretty abysmal when you were looking at strictly hard-kill. So most engagements are either shoot the launch platform (whether it be sub ship or plane) (easier) or if you had to engage the inbound - a multifaceted defense trying to achieve soft kill and relying on hard kill as a last resort.

Speaking about TLAMs (and to try to get back on topic I guess.) I was sitting in initial ground school at my airline that flies yellow airplanes - it's after lunch, warm and stuffy in the classroom, and it's just the ground instructor doing death by powerpoint droning on about programming the MCDU on the Airbus, so I'm pretty out of it and struggling mightly to stay awake... so in my sleepy haze with my head doing touch and goes on the desk- I hear the word "tophat" (Do other airlines also call it "tophat"?) which refers to the sequence of buttons you press to do something with the MCDU. I don't remember the buttons, just the pattern, so i think ... F-PLAN -> RADNAV -> PROG -> PERF -> FUEL PRED -> SEC F-PLAN etc...

Now I'm confused why I'm hearing the word "tophat" in an airline ground school and trying to get alert. Then I realize I got excited over nothing...

In TLAM world, TOPHAT is a maneuver TLAM strike planners program into the flight path of a TLAM. - in the electronic brain of the TLAM if it detects if it's too early to achieve TOT (time on target), it will execute a TOPHAT maneuver - it turns 90 degrees left or right of the programmed flight path, flies however long it needs to to get back on time, turns right or left 90 degrees to parallel the original track, and then turns right or left 90 degrees again to intercept the path, and then finally left or right to rejoin the original flight path. Basically a delay vector for a TLAM(s). The location for the maneuver is chosen where there is low probability of detection of the missile(s) by radar, people on the ground, etc... and where the missile won't clobber into the ground.

So @NovemberEcho if you're ever on the scope and you're tracking a primary return with no transponder that's flying in formation with several other similar objects and you see it do the 90 degree turns, you can lean over to your buddy controller(s) and whisper "Hey those cruise missiles just did a TOPHAT..."
 
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