An airline's view on logging PIC

Derg

Cap, Roci
Staff member
An airline\'s view on logging PIC

While doing a little research on Southwest Airlines this afternoon for a post in a different thread, I came across a very good description of PIC time:

Southwest Airlines defines "Pilot in Command" as the Pilot responsible for the operation and safety of the aircraft during flight. This definition is taken from PART I of the FAR. Southwest Airlines further allows logging of PIC as follows: For an aircraft requiring a type rating: If both pilots are type rated, the pilot in the left seat and sole manipulator of the controls may log PIC. If only one pilot is type rated only that pilot may log PIC, regardless of seat position. For aircraft not requiring a type rating: Only the pilot in the left seat and sole manipulator of the controls may log PIC.
 

JDMcFly

New Member
Re: An airline\'s view on logging PIC

I don't agree with 'fuzzying' it up with logging PIC time anyways... Though I'm not flying yet
 

EatSleepFly

Well-Known Member
Re: An airline\'s view on logging PIC

You mean theres something wrong with having 927 hours of safety pilot PIC time? Dangit.....
 

aloft

New Member
Re: An airline\'s view on logging PIC

Sounds like all you flight instructors are SOL as well, since you're rarely A) in the left seat and B) sole manipulator of the controls.

Personally, I'm not gonna take the time to research how every potential employer defines PIC time; I'm going to log it per the FAA's rules.
 

junkstream

Well-Known Member
Re: An airline\'s view on logging PIC

Actually, that 1,000 hr PIC time is 1,000 TURBINE PIC. So flight instructors need not worry about how they log dual given. It only counts toward the total time requirement at SWA, which I believe is 2,500 hr.
 

EatSleepFly

Well-Known Member
Re: An airline\'s view on logging PIC

[ QUOTE ]
Sounds like all you flight instructors are SOL as well, since you're rarely A) in the left seat and B) sole manipulator of the controls.

[/ QUOTE ]

How do you figure, when the very first line of that reads:

[ QUOTE ]
Southwest Airlines defines "Pilot in Command" as the Pilot responsible for the operation and safety of the aircraft during flight.

[/ QUOTE ]


The rest of it falls under the heading of:

[ QUOTE ]
Southwest Airlines further allows logging of PIC as follows:

[/ QUOTE ]
 
G

Guest

Guest
Re: An airline\'s view on logging PIC

Isn't it generally true, that a captain holds the type rating and the FO does not? Or is it different from company to company.
 

ready2fly

Well-Known Member
Re: An airline\'s view on logging PIC

At Southwest - both pilots are type-rated in the 737. YOu have to have the type-rating to interview at SWA.
 

MikeD

Administrator
Staff member
Re: An airline\'s view on logging PIC

[ QUOTE ]
Actually, that 1,000 hr PIC time is 1,000 TURBINE PIC. So flight instructors need not worry about how they log dual given. It only counts toward the total time requirement at SWA, which I believe is 2,500 hr.

[/ QUOTE ]

Aside from the 737 Type, it's nice to know I meet their mins. Anybody know if United still advertises a Commercial and 350 TT as their mins (though I never saw anyone hired with that time). But in the college days, I remember that being their min requirements.
 

Jason

Well-Known Member
Re: An airline\'s view on logging PIC

Mike - last time I looked(and it's been a few years) I was thinking United's mins were something like 1200 or 1500 or something - still pretty low by anybody's definition. I was reading a book about the history of airlines and apparently there was a point in time back in the day of the recip prop airliners that the airlines were so desperatley short of pilots that they had people starting ground school with United the day after the DE signed their commercial/instrument ticket and 350 hours would have been considered high time for a new hire!!!!! Imagine that.


Jason
 

kellwolf

Piece of Trash
Re: An airline\'s view on logging PIC

[ QUOTE ]
Southwest Airlines defines "Pilot in Command" as the Pilot responsible for the operation and safety of the aircraft during flight

[/ QUOTE ]
[ QUOTE ]
For aircraft not requiring a type rating: Only the pilot in the left seat and sole manipulator of the controls may log PIC

[/ QUOTE ]

Ok, maybe I'm missing something here, but this seems to contradict itself. The CFI is ultimately responsible for the safety of the a/c, but he may not be the sole manipulator of the controls, and he more than likely is in the right seat. I guess they can log PIC if they are training another CFI.
 
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