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Low&Slow

Ancora imparo
Been sitting on my ass (you can totally say ass) for the last few years with an FAA Form 8610-2 in the top drawer of my tool box. Finally got tired of looking at it and cashed it in for the General, Airframe, and Powerplant written exams this past week. Passed 'em all on the first try.
So far, so good. Gonna meet my DME this Thursday, September 19th in Smyrna, TN for the Orals and Practicals. Hopefully it goes well.
 

knot4u

Repeat Offender
Been sitting on my ass (you can totally say ass) for the last few years with an FAA Form 8610-2 in the top drawer of my tool box. Finally got tired of looking at it and cashed it in for the General, Airframe, and Powerplant written exams this past week. Passed 'em all on the first try.
So far, so good. Gonna meet my DME this Thursday, September 19th in Smyrna, TN for the Orals and Practicals. Hopefully it goes well.
Good luck. Try to not overthink it or get overly stressed. If you don't know the answer to a question just make sure you know where to find the correct answer.
 

Low&Slow

Ancora imparo
Good luck. Try to not overthink it or get overly stressed. If you don't know the answer to a question just make sure you know where to find the correct answer.
Thanks. I'll try not to stress too much. Just going to review some things between now and then and stay focused.
 

knot4u

Repeat Offender
Thanks brother! #fistbump
Do they still have questions about pressure carburetors, radial engine firing orders, and dope and fabric control surface recovering? I understand these days the DMEs put input your info to the FAA online and get sent a random set of questions and tasks that you have to successfully complete. If you don't mind I'd appreciate a modern perspective of your experience, it's been over 25 years since I did mine and I'm curious just how different it is now.
 

Low&Slow

Ancora imparo
I got >95 on the writtens, and there are plenty of ASA and other books out there to study the writtens from, so I'm assuming you are talking about the orals and practicals?
There is a General section, two Airframe sections, and a Powerplant section. All of the oral exam questions and practical exam projects are randomly generated. The DME doesn't even know what is on the test until, I think, the day before. LOTS of fire and fire protection questions were in EVERY of the sections of my oral test. LOTS and LOTS and LOTS. I missed one General question, one Airframe question, and three Powerplant questions. Powerplant isn't my strongest subject because I only occasionally get to help our engine guy out, and we only have GE 700/701 Turbine engines. I knew it was my weak subject before I went in.
They still ask about pressure carbs and float carbs, I don't remember radial engine firing order questions, but there were plenty of radial engine questions like hydraulic lock, and cooling, and lots of other recip questions that could apply to O or R engines. Stuff like engine ignition, bearings, magnetos, valve overlap, engine and engine compartment fire protection, etc. I was surprised at how much of the powerplant oral was about turbine engines. I would say probably about 60% of the powerplant section pertained to turbines.
There was also wood, fabric, dope questions, aircraft finishes, aircraft registration lettering (14CFR45), rigging, maths, physics, electrical systems ("SLA" seems to be the new buzzword because it was used a lot), engine instruments, LOTS of fire protection system questions, oxygen systems, cabin pressurization, constant-speed props, corrosion, landing gear, hydraulics, pneumatics, fuel systems, FARs, and I can't remember what else. Lots of stuff though.
My practicals were to determine correct size rivets for a sheetmetal patch and then make a rivet layout, read/use a micrometer, make a maintenance entry (14CFR43.9), make a 100-hour inspection entry (14CFR43.11), determine if a repair is major or minor (14CFR43 Appendix A), use a Service Bulletin, test a thermocouple for resistance and/or continuity, bend tubing and flare/swage both ends so it fits in a specific spot in a jig, inspect engine compartment for squawks, troubleshoot pitot heat system, replace brake pad linings, determine weight and balance after removing something and adding something, determine if a constant-speed propeller is within acceptable pitch range, determine the removal and installation procedure for a PT6 engine on a KA200, and there might be some others that I can't think of right now, but that was the bulk of it.
I passed every practical test item without any problem, I was well prepared. When I left, the examiner said he was very impressed and was also going to change one of the practical tests to be performed the way that I did it because my technique was different and better than any that he had ever seen for that particular one. I thanked him, and he thanked me back saying, it was a privilege to have an applicant that made it so easy for him. I asked him what he meant, and he gave me a few horror stories of applicants that weren't ready to test, and some other horror stories of things that happened during his tenure as a DME.
 
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knot4u

Repeat Offender
I got >95 on the writtens, and there are plenty of ASA and other books out there to study the writtens from, so I'm assuming you are talking about the orals and practicals?
There is a General section, two Airframe sections, and a Powerplant section. All of the oral exam questions and practical exam projects are randomly generated. The DME doesn't even know what is on the test until, I think, the day before. LOTS of fire and fire protection questions were in EVERY of the sections of my oral test. LOTS and LOTS and LOTS. I missed one General question, one Airframe question, and three Powerplant questions. Powerplant isn't my strongest subject because I only occasionally get to help our engine guy out, and we only have GE 700/701 Turbine engines. I knew it was my weak subject before I went in.
They still ask about pressure carbs and float carbs, I don't remember radial engine firing order questions, but there were plenty of radial engine questions like hydraulic lock, and cooling, and lots of other recip questions that could apply to O or R engines. Stuff like engine ignition, bearings, magnetos, valve overlap, engine and engine compartment fire protection, etc. I was surprised at how much of the powerplant oral was about turbine engines. I would say probably about 60% of the powerplant section pertained to turbines.
There was also wood, fabric, dope questions, aircraft finishes, aircraft registration lettering (14CFR45), rigging, maths, physics, electrical systems ("SLA" seems to be the new buzzword because it was used a lot), engine instruments, LOTS of fire protection system questions, oxygen systems, cabin pressurization, constant-speed props, corrosion, landing gear, hydraulics, pneumatics, fuel systems, FARs, and I can't remember what else. Lots of stuff though.
My practicals were to determine correct size rivets for a sheetmetal patch and then make a rivet layout, read/use a micrometer, make a maintenance entry (14CFR43.9), make a 100-hour inspection entry (14CFR43.11), determine if a repair is major or minor (14CFR43 Appendix A), use a Service Bulletin, test a thermocouple for resistance and/or continuity, bend tubing and flare/swage both ends so it fits in a specific spot in a jig, inspect engine compartment for squawks, troubleshoot pitot heat system, replace brake pad linings, determine weight and balance after removing something and adding something, determine if a constant-speed propeller is within acceptable pitch range, determine the removal and installation procedure for a PT6 engine on a KA200, and there might be some others that I can't think of right now, but that was the bulk of it.
I passed every practical test item without any problem, I was well prepared. When I left, the examiner said he was very impressed and was also going to change one of the practical tests to be performed the way that I did it because my technique was different and better than any that he had ever seen for that particular one. I thanked him, and he thanked me back saying, it was a privilege to have an applicant that made it so easy for him. I asked him what he meant, and he gave me a few horror stories of applicants that weren't ready to test, and some other horror stories of things that happened during his tenure as a DME.
Definitely a different experience than mine. I don't remember everything that was covered but it sounds like yours was a lot more thorough. Makes sense because he didn't know you, whereas my examiners were the same teachers that taught the subjects I was being tested on so we already knew each other. That doesn't mean they made it easier, probably just more efficient because they didn't concentrate on areas they knew I would have no issues with and concentrated on areas they thought I might be weak in. Did your DME happen to mention if your test was completely random or whether or not they looked at your written tests results when your test was was generated?
 

Low&Slow

Ancora imparo
Yeah, he said the oral and the practicals were completely randomly selected by the FAA.
I'm curious if everyone else felt like a firefighter technician after their test or if mine was a fluke and just happened to have an absurd amount of fire, fire safety, and fire system questions.
 

knot4u

Repeat Offender
Yeah, he said the oral and the practicals were completely randomly selected by the FAA.
I'm curious if everyone else felt like a firefighter technician after their test or if mine was a fluke and just happened to have an absurd amount of fire, fire safety, and fire system questions.
I don't know much about about fire protection systems, I managed to prove that fact on a G-IV APU fire bottle on a Friday afternoon. Luckily Gulfstream KVNY had one in stock and the airplane made the saturday departure. There are those that have and those that will. Good luck.
 

Roger Roger

Paid to sleep, fly for fun
The number of times I’ve needed to know what a Lindbergh or a Systron-Donner fire detection system is is exactly zero. The loop senses heat one of a couple ways and if it’s bad you replace it.
 

CFI A&P

Exploring the world one toilet at a time.
Welcome to the club. Now join the A&P Facebook groups and watch people post photos then complain about poor safety wire jobs.

You'll be eligible for the Charles Taylor Master Mechanic award in September 2069.
 
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Low&Slow

Ancora imparo
Welcome to the club. Now join the A&P Facebook groups and watch people posts photos then complain about poor safety wire jobs.

You'll be eligible for the Charles Taylor Master Mechanic award in September 2069.
Thanks!
2069 you say...sounds like a great way to celebrate my 100th Birthday!
:bounce:
 

knot4u

Repeat Offender
I'll give you two simple pieces of advice;
#1 If you see, smell, or hear a Hawker walk or run in any direction other than towards it, if caught deny being a mechanic.
#2 Learjets were built when no one knew anything about working on small jets. Follow the Hawker advice, if/when you're finally caught a Lear will at least make sense, it'll just be extremely physically difficult to fix.
 

Roger Roger

Paid to sleep, fly for fun
I'll give you two simple pieces of advice;
#1 If you see, smell or hear a Hawker walk or run in any direction other than towards it, if caught deny being a mechanic.
#2 Learjets were built when no one knew anything about working on small jets. Follow the Hawker advice, if/when you're finally caught a Lear will at least make sense, it'll just be extremely physically difficult to fix.
The only maintenance I’ve done at the new place was getting back to the single point fueling controller in a LJ31 to check for voltage at a certain pin. It’s not quite as far back as the inverters but it’s close. I’m ok not going back there again.
 

knot4u

Repeat Offender
The only maintenance I’ve done at the new place was getting back to the single point fueling controller in a LJ31 to check for voltage at a certain pin. It’s not quite as far back as the inverters but it’s close. I’m ok not going back there again.
I hope you never have an autopilot issue caused by the yaw damper, as I recall there's some sort of a control box mounted on the FWD side of the furthest aft bulkhead in the tailcone. The only way to access it is to disassemble everything that's in your way. Brilliant!
 

MaverickSawyer

Well-Known Member
I'll give you two simple pieces of advice;
#1 If you see, smell, or hear a Hawker walk or run in any direction other than towards it, if caught deny being a mechanic.
#2 Learjets were built when no one knew anything about working on small jets. Follow the Hawker advice, if/when you're finally caught a Lear will at least make sense, it'll just be extremely physically difficult to fix.
Citations, though, seem to be fairly straight forward. Granted, I've only been working on them for about 6 weeks, but there's definitely cases of things having been designed with mechanics in mind.
 
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