Advice for a n00b jet pilot

Autothrust Blue

"Blakeley's face was grave."
At a certain point the ability to simply "fly the f-ing airplane" comes into play. Procedures were written by men and edited by lawyers - at a certain point if the procedure is ambiguous or creates a greater hazard, you have to use your wits to solve the problem.

Incidentally, very few of the major malfunctions I've had have had any sort of checklist.
I'd say the most hazardous mechanical or system conditions I have encountered (including an elevator flutter in a CRJ - it's nice to be alive, you see) did not have any associated procedure other than "keep it under control, land where safe to do so" either.
 

Toobdrvr

Estrellas Asesino
To calculate TOD: Take the ALT to lose/1000, Apply Temp and Pressure corrections to IAS to get GS, then divide by 60 to get Mi/min. Apply desired VSI rate. Divide by the square of your shoe size plus 1/2 your age and......start down at 100mi...
 

ppragman

FLIPY FLAPS!
To calculate TOD: Take the ALT to lose/1000, Apply Temp and Pressure corrections to IAS to get GS, then divide by 60 to get Mi/min. Apply desired VSI rate. Divide by the square of your shoe size plus 1/2 your age and......start down at 100mi...
If the math for doing a 3:1 is that hard... especially in the days of VNAV and GPS... Well, I am not sure that this stuff is for you. Even without it I wouldn't call it complicated.

(Altitude to Lose in thousands)*3NM = miles to start down from.

"Oh we're at FL250, the airport is at sealevel. We should start down 75nm out." Then you literally count down by 3s.

To get your descent rate, literally just take your ground speed (and you can ballpark that real easy), cut that in half, and add a zero. If you get to the next altitude early, shallow your descent, if you get their late, steepen your descent. "We do about 300KIAS in the descent in this airplane, so let's start at 1500fpm and see how that works."

After you do it once in the airplane you'll know a good target "initial" groundspeed, adjust from there.

If this is some Herculean intellectual challenge then slap your HS algebra teacher.
 

Toobdrvr

Estrellas Asesino
If the math for doing a 3:1 is that hard... especially in the days of VNAV and GPS... Well, I am not sure that this stuff is for you. Even without it I wouldn't call it complicated.

(Altitude to Lose in thousands)*3NM = miles to start down from.

"Oh we're at FL250, the airport is at sealevel. We should start down 75nm out." Then you literally count down by 3s.

To get your descent rate, literally just take your ground speed (and you can ballpark that real easy), cut that in half, and add a zero. If you get to the next altitude early, shallow your descent, if you get their late, steepen your descent. "We do about 300KIAS in the descent in this airplane, so let's start at 1500fpm and see how that works."

After you do it once in the airplane you'll know a good target "initial" groundspeed, adjust from there.

If this is some Herculean intellectual challenge then slap your HS algebra teacher.
Uhh, it was a joke...
 

OneNineHundy

Well-Known Member
Congrats on the first Jet! It seems to have worked for me in anything from the 320,73,78. TOD altitude to loose x 3 plus 10. On the way down just keep doing this calculation. It's conservative but works in any conditions.

When configuring for approach if you think you are high then level off, speedbrake out, slow down and select a nice draggy flap. On the bus flap 2 works well. Then wind up the speed to max flap speed -10kts. It will drop like a stone.

1nm of level flight will slow you 10kts.

It sounds counterintuitive but if I see I have f'd something up (regularly) and no speed constraints I will wind up the speed as much as possible and get that speed brake out. At approach speeds you may as well open up the window and stick your hand out. The speed brake has the same effect on energy management at slow speeds. Similar to a night on the town...go ugly early. On the flightdeck go speedbrake early.

As echoed above.....slowly does it. The best pilots during an emergency don't get flustered and look half asleep. I'm guilty of it. Big flashing ECAM Engine Fire. Then rush into the associated checklists. But no, wrong. What else has failed? Is the other engine ok? Get the big picture then work out what checklist is appropriate and in what order. For any non normal my routine now is to have a drink of water and take time to verify the failures. Note I didn't say failure. In simulator world there is often a bunch of things failing at the same time. Terrible reliability those sims.
 

Toobdrvr

Estrellas Asesino
I think guys believe their own crap that airline guys could never come back and do it without vnav. As a guy that went back and forth I can attest takes a second to get fast at it...but after the 3rd leg your brain turns back on and it's fine.
I pretty much never quit doin it. I really miss being able to put some reference point in “INIT B” on Fifi and x-checking along the way. I just used the range rings on the 88 and 220. Can’t wait to check out the VNAV on the “UNA”!:bounce:
 

jynxyjoe

The Kickin' Chicken!
I pretty much never quit doin it. I really miss being able to put some reference point in “INIT B” on Fifi and x-checking along the way. I just used the range rings on the 88 and 220. Can’t wait to check out the VNAV on the “UNA”!:bounce:
I think I pretty much quit, I just use the TLBR method and every once in a while I'll be moving at a nice round number of miles a minute and I'll see the numbers match up perfectly and I'll say, "Oh yeah, I remember that!"
 
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