Advice for a n00b jet pilot

tlove482

Well-Known Member
Ask lots of questions early on. That way you don't feel dumb when you're 1000 hours in and you ask a beginner question.

As for CRM, if you've been single pilot for the last 5000 hours the hardest thing to do will be to let someone else do stuff for you. You'll be an awesome PM because you're brain will be thinking "what would I do" and then the captain will ask for it. Talk out loud if you don't already. Like someone else said, there is more trust if the other guy knows what you're thinking.
 

SteveC

Really?
Staff member
Yeah that ^

Communicate.

For example, if you’re PF - do the mental math 3:1 stuff out loud; tell him what you’re planning to do, and do so earlier than you think is necessary; tell him what you expect to happen; tell him your contingency plan...basically do your thinking out loud so both of your brains are working together.
 

jynxyjoe

The Kickin' Chicken!
Yeah that ^

Communicate.

For example, if you’re PF - do the mental math 3:1 stuff out loud; tell him what you’re planning to do, and do so earlier than you think is necessary; tell him what you expect to happen; tell him your contingency plan...basically do your thinking out loud so both of your brains are working together.
That's the most C'mon solution to bringing a single pilot captain into a crew environment.
 

jrh

Well-Known Member
Lots of fantastic advice here.

I made a similar jump to yours a few years ago. 4500 hours in piston airplanes, then into Citations flying charter.

To add a few thoughts now...

During abnormals/emergencies, don't be in a rush to do anything. I can't speak for the Lears, but in the Citations, there's essentially nothing that can go wrong requiring immediate action. You literally could sit and stare at the flashing master warning for a minute or two and probably still be ok.

As for CRM, tons of great thoughts already. The only thing I haven't seen brought up yet is the importance of a sterile cockpit down low, below 10k or FL180, whatever your company specifies. Sterile cockpit rules are always important in all aircraft, but especially critical with the speed and complexity of a jet.
 

Roger Roger

Paid to sleep, fly for fun
As for CRM, tons of great thoughts already. The only thing I haven't seen brought up yet is the importance of a sterile cockpit down low, below 10k or FL180, whatever your company specifies. Sterile cockpit rules are always important in all aircraft, but especially critical with the speed and complexity of a jet.
This is always a good reminder.
 

JordanD

Honorary Member
Lots of fantastic advice here.

I made a similar jump to yours a few years ago. 4500 hours in piston airplanes, then into Citations flying charter.

To add a few thoughts now...

During abnormals/emergencies, don't be in a rush to do anything. I can't speak for the Lears, but in the Citations, there's essentially nothing that can go wrong requiring immediate action. You literally could sit and stare at the flashing master warning for a minute or two and probably still be ok.

As for CRM, tons of great thoughts already. The only thing I haven't seen brought up yet is the importance of a sterile cockpit down low, below 10k or FL180, whatever your company specifies. Sterile cockpit rules are always important in all aircraft, but especially critical with the speed and complexity of a jet.
The best explanation I ever heard for that was there's "one sip" and "two sip" emergencies. *Ding* "Hmmm..." take one sip of coffee, think about the situation, run the checklist." or *Ding* "Hmmm..." take one sip of coffee, think about the situation, take another sip of coffee, think about it again, then run the checklist."
 

ozziecat35

4 out of 5 great lakes prefer Michigan.
The best explanation I ever heard for that was there's "one sip" and "two sip" emergencies. *Ding* "Hmmm..." take one sip of coffee, think about the situation, run the checklist." or *Ding* "Hmmm..." take one sip of coffee, think about the situation, take another sip of coffee, think about it again, then run the checklist."
Bingo. During my upgrade sims, we hit emergencies hard with regards to decision making. V1 cuts etc become rote and are important, but don’t require you to rush. When you rush in a jet you flip the wrong switch. Take a deep breath. Sip some coffee, make a plan, and execute it.

Guarded switches are guarded for a reason...think long and hard when you touch one. Usually you’re asking the other pilot to verify when you’re touching anything guarded, fuel, or engine related.

Remember ATC doesn’t fly your jet. If you’re staring at the center of an attenuating red cell, tell them what you need. If they don’t respond in a timely fashion, do it and tell them (within reason).

And I’m sure you know this, be humble. My brief is essentially “I try really hard to leave my ego at the door, if I’m being stupid, or about to be stupid, speak up, call me stupid, we’ll fix it, then laugh about how stupid I was over beers later.”
 

KLB

Well-Known Member
How are the SOP's for the operation? Good SOP's are really half the battle. It will be a piece of cake if you have that structure.

Yes the plane moves faster. But we are all doing 250 below 10. Above 10 and speed is more irrelevant to pace of flying. A busy victor airway in a turbo prop has a higher workload than a jet airway in a jet. This will be an easy transition for you.

CRM and crew coordination are the two big differences going from single pilot to multi crew. Having the guy/gal knowing what you're doing is of the most importance. ADM becomes more of a "crew" thing more than a "you" thing.
 

BobDDuck

Island Bus Driver
The best explanation I ever heard for that was there's "one sip" and "two sip" emergencies. *Ding* "Hmmm..." take one sip of coffee, think about the situation, run the checklist." or *Ding* "Hmmm..." take one sip of coffee, think about the situation, take another sip of coffee, think about it again, then run the checklist."
There's a great video of a hydraulic emergency in a Swiss 330 (they were filming for something else when it happened) where the captain stops the checklists at one point and orders everybody to eat a piece of chocolate to pause the situation.
 

JordanD

Honorary Member
There's a great video of a hydraulic emergency in a Swiss 330 (they were filming for something else when it happened) where the captain stops the checklists at one point and orders everybody to eat a piece of chocolate to pause the situation.
A fun exercise is telling someone no checklists, just solve the problem on your own, then giving them an engine failure, then an engine fire on the other side. I bet in the no checklist scenario a not insignificant number of people instinctively reach for that bright red handle as soon as the fire bell goes off and pull it without stopping to think that yes, it's on fire, but yes, it's the only engine producing thrust right now and you're right next to the airport.
 

ppragman

FLIPY FLAPS!
A fun exercise is telling someone no checklists, just solve the problem on your own, then giving them an engine failure, then an engine fire on the other side. I bet in the no checklist scenario a not insignificant number of people instinctively reach for that bright red handle as soon as the fire bell goes off and pull it without stopping to think that yes, it's on fire, but yes, it's the only engine producing thrust right now and you're right next to the airport.
This is actually a great way to teach systems if you have a sim or a cockpit procedures trainer.

"Alright, so if you were designing this airplane, what would you think you'd want to do first?"
 

Autothrust Blue

"Blakeley's face was grave."
I'm in the process of still figuring out the Airbus from the E170 so I consider myself in the camp of "I once again suck and feel like I'm in a jet for the first time" but my advice when trying to get it slowed down coming down the glideslope is "you can always drop the anchor" and lower the gear. Starting to think on the Airbus it's necessary more often than the E Jet.
Redneck speedbrakes extend!
 

Autothrust Blue

"Blakeley's face was grave."
A fun exercise is telling someone no checklists, just solve the problem on your own, then giving them an engine failure, then an engine fire on the other side. I bet in the no checklist scenario a not insignificant number of people instinctively reach for that bright red handle as soon as the fire bell goes off and pull it without stopping to think that yes, it's on fire, but yes, it's the only engine producing thrust right now and you're right next to the airport.
Ah, well...
This is actually a great way to teach systems if you have a sim or a cockpit procedures trainer.

"Alright, so if you were designing this airplane, what would you think you'd want to do first?"
ENG 1 FAIL + ENG 2 FIRE (but still running). Guess what the ECAM wants fixed first?
 

ppragman

FLIPY FLAPS!
"Too many failures deep" is a thing, too.
At a certain point the ability to simply "fly the f-ing airplane" comes into play. Procedures were written by men and edited by lawyers - at a certain point if the procedure is ambiguous or creates a greater hazard, you have to use your wits to solve the problem.

Incidentally, very few of the major malfunctions I've had have had any sort of checklist.
 
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