A question regarding Air Force

Bond007

New Member
What position in Air Force gives you the opportunity to gather more flying hours, and which position is most helpful when applying to Airlines?

Is it the AIRLIFT PILOT (transport heavy equipment), BOMBER PILOT, or FIGHTER PILOT?

And, the commitment for Air Force is very long -- 10years. Can it be made short?


I am 18yrs old Freshman (second semester) in College pursuing my Bachelor's in Computer Science.
 

MDPilot

Well-Known Member
[ QUOTE ]
What position in Air Force gives you the opportunity to gather more flying hours, and which position is most helpful when applying to Airlines?

And, the commitment for Air Force is very long -- 10years. Can it be made short?


[/ QUOTE ]

I would encourage you to rethink your motivation for desiring to become an Air Force pilot of ANY type. If the main reason is to build hours for the airlines, then you will not be happy with the 10 year committment (after completing 1 year of UPT.) This is assuming you were able to make it through UPT with that as your main motivation.
Becoming a military pilot of any branch of the services requires a burning desire to BE a military officer and pilot. That's it! Any good things that may happen to you, like building hours for another career outside the military, is strictly secondary, and in reality, not something you spend a lot of time thinking about while risking your life in defense of your country. Look inward and realize that the path of becoming a military pilot is not the easy way to become an airline pilot. I'm not arguing that it doesn't happen, but very few people can put up with the hardships inherent in military life solely to become a airline pilot.
 

sbav8r

New Member
If you want to fly for the airlines than you might as well just stay civilian and work your way through the ranks. Instructor, cargo, regional, etc... You and the military would be much better off.
 

Hootie

Old Skool
[ QUOTE ]


I would encourage you to rethink your motivation for desiring to become an Air Force pilot of ANY type. If the main reason is to build hours for the airlines, then you will not be happy with the 10 year committment (after completing 1 year of UPT.) This is assuming you were able to make it through UPT with that as your main motivation.
Becoming a military pilot of any branch of the services requires a burning desire to BE a military officer and pilot. That's it! Any good things that may happen to you, like building hours for another career outside the military, is strictly secondary, and in reality, not something you spend a lot of time thinking about while risking your life in defense of your country. Look inward and realize that the path of becoming a military pilot is not the easy way to become an airline pilot. I'm not arguing that it doesn't happen, but very few people can put up with the hardships inherent in military life solely to become a airline pilot.

[/ QUOTE ]

Well said.

Go for what you want to fly and be happy with what you end up being assigned. After you do 11 years flying in the air force (no you cant shorten it) its probably not going to come down to what you flew but if you were a good officer/pilot or a jackoff. Just take it one step at a time, because its not like they exactly give away pilot slots.
 

ShoreFly

Well-Known Member
If after listening to MDPilot's good advice you still think the military is for you, I HIGHLY suggest you get a Air Reseve or Guard postion. Yes, that damn 10 year commitment will still haunt you, but after your initial Active Duty training period (~2 years) is over, you can persue a job with a commercial carrier while still serving in the military.

Here at McGuire AFB we have many KC-10 (military DC-10) pilots that started out that way, and except for those that were activated during Iraqi Freedom, they have uninterrupted carrers with the majors.

Lastly, I do not recommend becoming an Active Duty pilot at this time. Following the events of 9-11, the majority of aircrew members' quality of life has gone way down along with morale, and unfortunately the War on Terror is far from over, so there is no end in sight. Many of us are trying to move on or out of the cockpit, and I feel sorry for those pilots only half way through their 8-10 year commitments.
 
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