A&P to dispatcher

#1
Hello all,
Been working as an corporate A&P for about 6 years and I am ready for a change. I need to get out of the heat/cold, away from all of the chemicals (skydrol), tight cramped spaces. I'd love a job that I could stay clean and still be in aviation.

Been looking in to dispatching and it seems like it would be a challenging job and I'm looking for some input from dispatchers in the field on how they like the job. Is it worth the school price?
 

Delta Echo

Well-Known Member
#2
It might be for you, but then you would also have to consider what the position requires, what and who dispatchers work with and how well you might fit into that environment.
Another option with your A&P is to look into Maintenance Control or Maintenance planning positions.
 

Flying Saluki

Well-Known Member
#8
Hello all,
Been working as an corporate A&P for about 6 years and I am ready for a change. I need to get out of the heat/cold, away from all of the chemicals (skydrol), tight cramped spaces. I'd love a job that I could stay clean and still be in aviation.

Been looking in to dispatching and it seems like it would be a challenging job and I'm looking for some input from dispatchers in the field on how they like the job. Is it worth the school price?
I think "intimidating" is more apt description than challenging. When you first get signed off at your employer and you take the desk for the first time you get an awesome sense of responsibility of the job. Don't worry, that fades pretty quickly. :) Not that it's not important, but it's not like we're NASA Flight Controllers calculating a lunar orbit rendezvous trajectory with a slide rule.

That said, I think the level of challenge comes from the environment you are working in. If you are working in a one-man shop with complete responsibility for dispatch, aircraft routing, and delay/cancel decisions, you are going to be more challenged than if you work in a large operation where your sole responsibilities are flight planning, release, and flight following.

Is it worth the price? Well, depending on where you go, 3 to 5 thousand dollars, and 5 to 8 weeks of schooling, gets you an entry level job paying $15 to $16 an hour at a regional airline. Stay there 10 years (ish) and you top out in the $23-$25 range (current rates). Or move on to a Supplemental/LCC, and you are starting in the $18-20 range. No idea where they top out. If you are one of the few* who make it to a major airline, you're starting in the $50-60K range, and topping out at about twice that (again, about 10 years). So, is it worth the price? Only you can say for sure.

*I say "few" because major airline dispatcher jobs are few and far between. The majors just went through a big hiring spree, and are likely set for a while in terms of staffing. Not that there won't be hiring, but it will likely be for attrition rather than growth. Also, there is a lot of competition for those jobs, both externally and internally. Unlike pilots and (I would guess) mechanics, major airlines will hire internal candidates with little or no experience. So not only are you competing with the 1000 other regional airline dispatchers out there, you are also competing with who-knows-how-many internal employees with a dispatcher license. Quoth Colonel Nathan Jessup: "Roll the dice and take your chances".
 

A-9er

Well-Known Member
#11
Funny, I don't remember that line. I remember Jessup sarcastically saying he wanted to help Lt. Caffey; I remember him saying there was nothing sexier than saluting a woman in the morning; but I do not remember that line. That's ok; it gives me an excuse to watch one of my FAVORITE movies again... :)
 

A-9er

Well-Known Member
#13
Funny, I don't remember that line. I remember Jessup sarcastically saying he wanted to help Lt. Caffey; I remember him saying there was nothing sexier than saluting a woman in the morning; but I do not remember that line. That's ok; it gives me an excuse to watch one of my FAVORITE movies again... :)
Thank you! There are so many good lines and scenes from that movie that that quote gets overshadowed.
 
Top