76 C177 RG

Urp99

Well-Known Member
It’s been a few years since I messed with one, but both my operation and the other one on the field that had a Pponk 520 had constant carb problems. Maybe we had lemons, or maybe they’ve ironed things out a little since. Also had a bad experience with a Pponk overhauled (but stock) 550. Again that one was old (running up on its 12 year TBO in fact) but it was not a good experience.
Huh, seems like we've had drastically different experiences on what are basically the same engines, although we've both only worked on a fleet of 3, lol, so not a big cross section of the fleet. I will say that I've twice had to send a carburetor back after overhaul/modification to be 'tinkered' with because the engine was running hot in climb. In both cases it worked fine when we got it back, but I'm guessing you're right about them not getting the carburetion right the first time.
 

knot4u

Repeat Offender
Please elaborate on the nose strut incident, not to pick on or embarrass you, but so others can learn that compressed gas can be dangerous. I heard a loud bang from an adjacent hangar a number of years ago and went to see what had happened. A mechanic and a helper were trying to remove the steering unit on a G-IV and for some reason removed the gland nut on the strut while it was still pressurized. The piston (with the axle removed) took a golf ball sized chunk of concrete out of the hangar floor. Nobody got physically hurt, probably just some wounded egos. They were both covered in hydraulic fluid and I imagine they may have needed a change of underwear. I shudder when I think about what I would have seen if one of them had their foot in the path of that piston. If compressed gases are involved don't take anything for granted, if you're not familiar with what you're trying to do find someone who is. The story above is also an excellent example of why actually reading the AMM before starting any job is important.
 

trafficinsight

Well-Known Member
Please elaborate on the nose strut incident, not to pick on or embarrass you, but so others can learn that compressed gas can be dangerous. I heard a loud bang from an adjacent hangar a number of years ago and went to see what had happened. A mechanic and a helper were trying to remove the steering unit on a G-IV and for some reason removed the gland nut on the strut while it was still pressurized. The piston (with the axle removed) took a golf ball sized chunk of concrete out of the hangar floor. Nobody got physically hurt, probably just some wounded egos. They were both covered in hydraulic fluid and I imagine they may have needed a change of underwear. I shudder when I think about what I would have seen if one of them had their foot in the path of that piston. If compressed gases are involved don't take anything for granted, if you're not familiar with what you're trying to do find someone who is. The story above is also an excellent example of why actually reading the AMM before starting any job is important.
Piper Cherokee main struts are only held together by the scissor link, the guy I used to work with gave himself a 5606 shower twice ;)

The second time he said "the scissor link bolt was really tight and I was thinking that should have meant something..."

Sent from my Moto Z (2) using Tapatalk
 

Roger Roger

Paid to sleep, fly for fun
Piper Cherokee main struts are only held together by the scissor link, the guy I used to work with gave himself a 5606 shower twice;)

The second time he said "the scissor link bolt was really tight and I was thinking that should have meant something..."

Sent from my Moto Z (2) using Tapatalk
That’s like....the only thing about Cherokee main struts.
 

knot4u

Repeat Offender
There is also the story about the A/P students at Van Nuys that went to service the tires on a GPU with split rims, somehow they got a bit confused and one of them tried to "close" the regulator on the nitrogen bottle. The wheel was typical A/P school industry discard level grade equipment and it blew up, taking the majority of one of the students legs with it. It sounds like an urban myth but it happened after I was already working and I heard about it and ended up meeting someone who was a student at the time and actually used her belt as a tourniquet to help slow the bleeding until first responders showed up. Compressed gases deserve respect.
 

Ozelot

Frozen Tundra TRACON
Please elaborate on the nose strut incident
I'll ask him next time I see him, I wasn't around that day. I don't remember exactly what he told me either, he did tell me, but my memory is foggy. So i'll get back to ya'll asap.

@knot4u Ok, so I got back from my buddies place. He said "Improperly set regulator on the nitrogen tank sent 3000 psi into the nose strut." Learned from that one.
 
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