3rd Class Cert

Windchill

Well-Known Member
After reading the posts regarding the process of a 1st class FAA cert., (insert sarcasm here) it's great to see there is sooo much consistency between doctors when handing out flight physicals. One would think there the process would be uniform.

My third class, no hearing and the doctor didn't have me read a line, he just asked what lines could I read. I could read them all and he's like, that's definately 20/20. I could read them all, although the last one may take a little squinting.
An hour in the waiting room for a physical that took literally no more than 2 1/2 minutes.
 

ready2fly

Well-Known Member
My 3rd class was just the oposite. It was thorough. VERY thorough. He checked:

Hearing
Sight including peripheral
Range of motion/resistance
urine
reflexes
anal exam
depth perception
color blindness acquity exam
hernia (turn your head and cough)
....and I'm sure I'm forgetting something.

Basically, the guy I went to is the tops down here amongst the Aviation Medical Examiners. You will absolutely know, beyond a shadow of a doubt, whether you can pass a 1st Class exam.

Personally, I prefer the thoroughness. I'm sure some don't though.
 

pscraig

Well-Known Member
My 3rd class was also very rigorous. When I got my 1st class, I specifically requested a very thorough exam, hoping to catch anything that might become an issue later on.
 

flyitup

Well-Known Member
</font><blockquote><font class="small">In reply to:</font><hr />
anal exam
hernia (turn your head and cough)


[/ QUOTE ]

Good lord! I went through a second class medical and didn't have to do any of that.

You must have had a gay doctor!
 

ready2fly

Well-Known Member
</font><blockquote><font class="small">In reply to:</font><hr />
You must have had a gay doctor!

[/ QUOTE ]
I wondered how he was doing the exam with both hands on my hips......


But seriously folks.....

I prefer the rigorous exam for the same reasons pscraig mentioned. If there is ANYTHING that might keep me from flying - I want to know. No surprises, please.
 

flyitup

Well-Known Member
</font><blockquote><font class="small">In reply to:</font><hr />
I prefer the rigorous exam for the same reasons pscraig mentioned. If there is ANYTHING that might keep me from flying - I want to know. No surprises, please.

[/ QUOTE ]

That is a good point. It would be very sad if you spent thousands of dollars on your training only to find out you can't pass a first class medical!
 
G

Guest

Guest
what's the average cost for a 1st class and a 3rd class med?

I know examiners vary, but a round about figure will do.

Thanks.
 

flyitup

Well-Known Member
</font><blockquote><font class="small">In reply to:</font><hr />
what's the average cost for a 1st class and a 3rd class med?

[/ QUOTE ]

My second class was $60.
 
Ya'll need to remember that a first class physical isn't supposed to be more thorough than a third. There's just more disqualifying conditions and higher standards for the first...the exam should be the same.
 

reaperman

Well-Known Member
I find it bizarre that you guys think the FAA medical exam is a good place to find out something is wrong with you. It's exactly like wanting to discover on your private check ride that you've been doing engine out procedures wrong from day one. It's even like taking a plane up to find out if the wings are attached properly.

Anything that appears on your flight physical will be with you forever and you will have to explain it away every single time you renew your medical certificate.

The check ride/physical is where you prove to the FAA that you should be allowed to fly, not where you find out you can't. You should go in knowing exactly what the result is going to be. You go to your personal physician ahead of time to gain that information. If anything is a potential problem, then you get your physician to write a letter explaining why you should pass the physical (e.g. you optometrist writes that your vision is 20/20 corrected, just in case you have trouble with whatever screwy eye test the AME has). The first time I went for a First Class (over forty), I took along a copy of my latest EKG from my own physician just in case the examiner did it wrong. Didn't need it but it was there if I did. You need to be as prepared for the mecdical exam as you are for a check ride.
 

JDMcFly

New Member
Just so you know, there is NO anal exam required by any class of FAA medical exam.. Unless you are just joking...
 

ready2fly

Well-Known Member
[ QUOTE ]
there is NO anal exam required by any class of FAA medical exam..

[/ QUOTE ]

What are you basing that on?

Maybe it's my age (36 at the time of the exam).
 

JDMcFly

New Member
Well, it may be age, I wouldn't know if it changes for age! (like you need an EKG after 35 or something I think)

But who knows, often I think these docs do basically the same checkup they do with their regular folks (they are required not to charge anymore than they would a normal examination) so it may be part of their thourough exam.

I really don't want an AME knowing more than they have to though..
 
[ QUOTE ]
But who knows, often I think these docs do basically the same checkup they do with their regular folks

[/ QUOTE ]

Your flight physical is just a basic exam...like any other checkup. There's nothing special about it (there shouldn't be, anyways). Some AME's are more thorough with their physical exam, which is not called for by the FAA. The big difference is in the medical history portion (which is only what you disclose).
 

ready2fly

Well-Known Member
[ QUOTE ]


Quote:
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But who knows, often I think these docs do basically the same checkup they do with their regular folks


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Your flight physical is just a basic exam...like any other checkup. There's nothing special about it (there shouldn't be, anyways). Some AME's are more thorough with their physical exam, which is not called for by the FAA. The big difference is in the medical history portion (which is only what you disclose).

[/ QUOTE ]

My AME is just that - an AME and nothing more. He doesn't do the ol' eyes-nose-and-throat routine any more...so, his examinations are pretty well the same for everyone I would imagine.

He IS incredibly thorough!!! My 3rd Class exam took just over an hour. Sometime during my Comm. I'm going to go do the 1st Class exam. That should take quite a while.
 

EatSleepFly

Well-Known Member
[ QUOTE ]
He IS incredibly thorough!!! My 3rd Class exam took just over an hour.

[/ QUOTE ]

Whoa...thats almost twice the time my first class takes..and thats including the paperwork!
 

Cav

Former Maddog Whisperer
I agree with reaperman...if you want a thorough physical to inquire about your health go get a checkup from an internist who is NOT your AME. If something does turn up why would you want the extra time and expense necessary to correct it before you could get/retain your medical? It will actually not cost you much more to have an exam by another physician as most checkups are covered by insurance while FAA exams are not. I've heard too many horror stories of people losing their medical for months if not years because of something trivial. Waivers generally take forever for the FAA to approve and if you have already visited a physician who has checked you out and DOCUMENTED that a certain issue is not a problem it will speed the process up. Don't encourage your AME to look for something past what they generally check for. Use your brain! AME are not the enemy but they do represent the FAA. An internist who sees you as a patient will be more concerned about your health and eager to help you retain it. Word of advice, when choosing an AME go to the airport and ask instructors and other pilots who they use. Mine is a A36 pilot who is not looking to fail anyone but I'm sure he would if it were apparent someone was not fit to fly. Not all AME's are created equal. Just my .02.
 
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