2020 DX Outlook With Coronavirus

Wonderlic

Well-Known Member
I don't think it'll go on that long. Airlines not only provide transportation for people and cargo; they're part of our national security. There's no way that the airline industry will be allowed to disappear.
They won’t disappear. They’ll avoid disappearing by furloughing a lot of their workforce.
 

CRJ200NEO

Well-Known Member
I tend to agree. I think I read somewhere that airlines are burning over $10B in cash per month. $60B in liquidity will last no more than 6 months and they’re saying this thing could drag on for 18 months. Hence the airlines offer a few days ago to hold off on their planned mass layoffs until September 1st if they’re given the complete bailout they’re seeking. This is just a bandaid on a broken leg.
If it does drag out for 18 months, its not going to be 18 months of quarantine and lockdown. People will slowly get back to their lives once the initial wave is contained, just like China is. Airlines still probably won't see a profit until 2022... Maybe late 2021 if we're lucky but it won't be losing $10B a month for 18 months - It can't be without an entire collapse.
I'd get on a plane tomorrow with absolutely no second thoughts if it weren't for the fear of getting stranded and the fact that everything is closed everywhere and a lot of my colleagues feel the same way. There will be more demand once things start reopening, even if the virus isn't completely contained. Load factors certainly won't be at pre-corona levels for a while, but flights won't have 12 people on them either.
Obviously no one really knows what we are in store for, and it could go either way, and until then we're all just along for the ride.
With that being said, I wouldn't want to be on the bottom of a seniority list anywhere right now.
 

who'swho

Don't hesitate. Penetrate!
My special needs cat has kidney disease. I suspect THAT's the reason she was dumped at the shelter. Anyway, one of the complications of FKD is that she doesn't get enough water in her colon to soften up her stool. When I first adopted her, I had to put her in the veterinary hospital to unclog her innards; her stool was too hard to pass. To help her go to the bathroom, I have to give her a mix of water and Miralax twice a day. Plus, what about the water and food? Won't they run out at some point? If she were healthy, I could leave 'em alone overnight with extra food and water. However, with her kidney disease, she needs her laxative every day.
Thought this was an aviation forum... Guess I took a wrong turn.
 

TJ94

Well-Known Member
With the stimulus package the participating airlines stipulate that they will not furlough anyone over the next 6 months. participants include 10 major carriers which includes cargo carriers. Hopefully the rebound for the industry will happen around May/June, if that happens I’m sure everyone in a major will be safe.

I can say at least one major is evaluating putting a package out and if the industry rebounds quickly it, potentially, could be good timing for those trying to get hired in DX.
 

DispatcherSam

Well-Known Member
Nobody knows when anything will bounce back or how long we will have our lives turned upside down, so prepare for the worst and hope for the best
 

flygirl142

Well-Known Member
I didn't see that this got passed after I went to bed. Now, hopefully house will pass it quickly.
 
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paincorp

Well-Known Member
Last time I checked Friday is tomorrow..?

Let’s all just chill out. Whatever happens; happens. Ain’t a thing under the sun us losers can do about it. So as Anakin Skywalker said to Obi Wan Kenobi “I recommend patience”.
As opposed to today is what I meant.
 

CF34-3B1

Well-Known Member
As the virus is just now starting to gain momentum here, and the us as a whole is still largely trying to bury its head in the sand wishing it will just *poof* go away because it’s getting warmer, the airlines will probably not be anywhere near back to normal by May, June, or even July. The bailout buys us low seniority guys some time fore sure, but that money will burn up quick
 

ATLiens

Well-Known Member
As the virus is just now starting to gain momentum here, and the us as a whole is still largely trying to bury its head in the sand wishing it will just *poof* go away because it’s getting warmer, the airlines will probably not be anywhere near back to normal by May, June, or even July. The bailout buys us low seniority guys some time fore sure, but that money will burn up quick
I think the most important thing is that time. The first thing management at companies do when times get tough is cut labor. This bill is not allowing them to do that, at least not in an involuntary way. So they will have to cut fat at the top and a lot of different ways (celebrity chefs that make business class meals etc) Hopefully by sept the demand and fat trimmed has been enough to keep us around.
 

flynryan692

Well-Known Member
I think the most important thing is that time. The first thing management at companies do when times get tough is cut labor. This bill is not allowing them to do that, at least not in an involuntary way. So they will have to cut fat at the top and a lot of different ways (celebrity chefs that make business class meals etc) Hopefully by sept the demand and fat trimmed has been enough to keep us around.
The bill doesn't allow them to cut labor, but it also doesn't force them to provide employees with their regular hours either. I'm betting the airlines will want to preserve the cash. Those who have had hours cut probably will not get to return to their regular hours, so they'll be forced to get second or third jobs to make ends meet, or quit. The employees get the short end of the stick still.
 

Squirrel

Well-Known Member
The bill doesn't allow them to cut labor, but it also doesn't force them to provide employees with their regular hours either. I'm betting the airlines will want to preserve the cash. Those who have had hours cut probably will not get to return to their regular hours, so they'll be forced to get second or third jobs to make ends meet, or quit. The employees get the short end of the stick still.

Bill requires the company to follow the cba.
 
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