172N to 172R

DrBenny

New Member
A Skyhawk is a Skyhawk, Right? Yes, but watch out. If you were transitioning from a 172N to, say, an Archer, you'd be mentally prepared for things to be different. In this case, I'd read all the pertinent materials, but I still had a few things to note. None of them were "gotchas," since I read up on things.

Overall, the checkout was a really good experience. My last flight was my checkride, so this checkout was quite enjoyable. In essence, it was a miniature checkride with on of the CFI's there, a very nice and professional pilot. Here's a link to the EXACT 172R I flew today:

http://www.frederickflightcenter.com/fleet/143.htm

Anyway, the plane flew like my CFI's 172N, although I'd swear it was a bit faster for the same power settings. (I need to recheck the POH numbers for comparison.) But, as you can see from the photo, it was all tricked out with electric trim, a nice autopilot, a KLN94B/KMD-550 MFD, etc.

Here are some of the differences:

1) Electric trim. As you know, I am a trim minimalist, but I do use it. My review: I did NOT like the electric trim. Why? It was too easy to use, and I got fussy with it (the same way some people can get fussy with constant power changes). I switched back to the manual trim, and was happy.

2) Ventilation system was much better.

3) Seats are more comfortable, and seatbelts are easy--just like with a car.

4) GPS/MFD combo is good. I don't have a lot of experience with the King, but I can see there is a lot of potential there. I really need an hour or two of ground on it.

5) REMEMBER TO SWITCH FROM "GPS" MODE TO "NAV" MODE. Darn! I even knew about this one, but it did turn out to be a "gotcha" for me. I had the foggles on, and was supposed to be tracking the VOR inbound. The CFI said, do you notice anything wrong? I looked around, but all I saw was that the needle didn't seem to be moving. Then he pointed out what I was missing. LOL.

6) Sump, sump, sump, sump, sump, sump, sump, sump, sump, sump, sump, sump, and sump. Thirteen sumps.

7) I hate the position of the tach (under the yoke).

Overall, I like the new 172Rs. They are more expensive to rent (anyplace) than the Ns, of course, so you have to make decisions. I could see where the GPS/MFD/AP combo would make for easy XCs, especially long ones. But then again, you might be able to find all of this on an N. I enjoyed flying it, though.

I'm good to rent with Frederick now. I'm thinking of getting checked out in their new 182s in the near future.

Next flight is in CFI's 172n--I'm taking up the guy that introduced me to aviation. I'm going to buy him a good lunch!
 

Nick

Well-Known Member
I hate those stupid 13 sumps. The worst part is thinking while you're doing it is that it's probably because some moron neglected to do it correctly, had water in the tanks, crashed, and blamed it on Cessna.

And by the way, the prices for the N and R I've flown are $68 and $115 per hour respectively. Quite a difference! The -R had a Garmin 430, HSI, and was 1999; the -N didn't have those items and was 1975.

Nick
 

E_Dawg

Moderator
Love that plane overall; hate the sumps, hate the light switches position, hate the tach location as well.
 

Mustang17c

Well-Known Member
Although the tach location does suck on the R, it is nice to get away from the cracked plastic on the N's panel. The R also has much better interior night lighting.
 

EatSleepFly

Well-Known Member
[ QUOTE ]
The worst part is thinking while you're doing it is that it's probably because some moron neglected to do it correctly, had water in the tanks, crashed, and blamed it on Cessna.

[/ QUOTE ]

Close. But actually its because of the way the tanks are designed.
 

lilrkt

New Member
I agree. I have read too many articles now about getting busted for dumping gas on the tarmac. I think about this every time I check all 13 but I have not made the decision to go out and buy one for myself yet. The 13 doesn't bother me so much. It's just part of the walk around anymore. I gladly trade that for the extended range. I do not like the location of the Tach/switches/avionics master but at least they are good sturdy switches that wont crap out right away. I do love the yoke though!
 

Center_Mid

Well-Known Member
Yeah, the money is a killer. At my field, the breakdown is $90/hr for a 172N, $120/hr for an R/S, and $130/hr for a 172SP.

I like the KLN-94 since it basically works the same as a Garmin 430. The new airplane smell is nice, but probably not $120/hr nice. I use them for instrument training, but stick with 152s for daytrips 'n such. Too bad the 152 doesn't have that autopilot tho. Man, that's sweet!
 

MidlifeFlyer

Well-Known Member
[ QUOTE ]
Yeah, the money is a killer. At my field, the breakdown is $90/hr for a 172N, $120/hr for an R/S, and $130/hr for a 172SP.

[/ QUOTE ]Wow!! Prices really vary a lot through the country. At my airport, the most expensive place charges $98 for an SP.
 
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