1500 hour rule...anyone?

Richman

Well-Known Member
#2
Elaine and Co can wish all they want, but it would literally take an act of Congress to change it, and they're not biting.
 

BEEF SUPREME

Well-Known Member
#3
I was kind of shocked how many caveats there are to the 1500 hr rule. When I was in new hire class at SkyWest a lot of the guys and gals had way under 1500 hrs. It was all R-ATP and I want to UND so blah blah blah matrix. A rule change is kind of a non event really.

The basic problem of not enough pilots for back fill is still there regardless.

I'm still for the basic principal of the rule however as it made wages go up, a lot.
 

tcco94

Professional GTA V Pilot
#4
Government moves at a snail pace. If you are a prospective student currently I would count on logging 1500 hours to get to the regionals, unless you're planning to get the R-ATP.
 

Flying Saluki

Well-Known Member
#5
Has there been any research done on what the "right" number of hours is for a pilot to have before flying for the airlines? Where did the 1500 hours come from? I know that is what you need to get an ATP, but why 1500? Why not 1000? Why not 2000? How did we arrive at 1500?
 

Flyinthrew

Well-Known Member
#6
If I had to start from scratch on this I think I would probably end up with about 1000 hours of glider time.

Also, I don't think there is a shortage of pilots directly because of the 1500 rule. I think it is more directly due to the fact that GA is dying in this country. If we want Congress to change rules to jumpstart pilot production, then they need to craft legislation that will revitalize AFFORDABLE small aircraft production. The current training fleet is turning to dust and the replacements are $400k/copy for pretty much nothing. Flight in the majority of GA aircraft in America involves some level of suspension of disbelief for the average teen or 20-something.
 
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Low&Slow

Ancora imparo
#7
If I had to start from scratch on this I think I would probably end up with about 1000 hours of glider time.

Also, I don't think there is a shortage of pilots directly because of the 1500 rule. I think it is more directly due to the fact that GA is dying in this country. If we want Congress to change rules to jumpstart pilot production, then they need to craft legislation that will revitalize AFFORDABLE small aircraft production. The current training fleet is turning to dust and the replacements are $400k/copy for pretty much nothing. Flight in the majority of GA aircraft in America involves some level of suspension of disbelief for the average teen or 20-something.
Allowing amateur/home built aircraft to be used for flight training would fix that. But the big manufacturers have the money and the lobbyists to make laws that are beneficial to them, not necessarily for the industry.
 

Murdoughnut

Well sized member
#8
Just a matter of time - Members of Congress from small market districts that lost service when the 50-seaters were parked will make it a priority - the rest of Congress won't really care.
 

Richman

Well-Known Member
#9
Just a matter of time - Members of Congress from small market districts that lost service when the 50-seaters were parked will make it a priority - the rest of Congress won't really care.
Been tried several times. Think about how the House of Representatives works and you'll figure out why.

NO one is going to vote to repeal it.
 
#10
Has there been any research done on what the "right" number of hours is for a pilot to have before flying for the airlines? Where did the 1500 hours come from? I know that is what you need to get an ATP, but why 1500? Why not 1000? Why not 2000? How did we arrive at 1500?
Who the hell knows. It was a kneejerk reaction to Colgan, when both of those pilots were hired with greater than 1500 hours anyway.
 

PilotLu

Well-Known Member
#11
I went to Vaughn College, they offered the R-ATP in their "Aircraft Operations" degree but in order to get it you would have to get your private, instrument, commercial, cfi-i, cfi-ii, multi, and multi cfi. For me, past cfi-i is just too much money to handle in a short amount of time. If you don't have all those ratings then you can't graduate. I ended up switching majors to the "Aeronautical Science" degree which was pretty much the same courses with a few different classes but it does not require you to have all the ratings done in order to graduate. I did all my training under a 141 flight school which is still part of the R-ATP program they offer. In other words, I pretty much got the same education as the people who could afford to get all their ratings in a short amount of time, just with a different degree name on my head. The point I'm trying to make is that 1500 hour rule just handicaps people like me that are trying to make it to airlines and elongates that process in which I'll still end up in the same place as the people with R-ATP. This rule just steer away new and upcoming pilots when they hear what they have to go through. I remember my fist semester freshman year, almost 200 people wanted to become pilots but then reality hit them when they saw the costs of flight training aside from the college tuition and had no choice but to switch majors. Only around 30 made it through and I was fortunate enough to be one of them.
 

deadstick

Well-Known Member
#15
If I had to start from scratch on this I think I would probably end up with about 1000 hours of glider time.

Also, I don't think there is a shortage of pilots directly because of the 1500 rule. I think it is more directly due to the fact that GA is dying in this country. If we want Congress to change rules to jumpstart pilot production, then they need to craft legislation that will revitalize AFFORDABLE small aircraft production. The current training fleet is turning to dust and the replacements are $400k/copy for pretty much nothing. Flight in the majority of GA aircraft in America involves some level of suspension of disbelief for the average teen or 20-something.
About 1/3 of the price of a new 172 goes to product liability insurance.

Many experienced/retired pilots won’t instruct any more because they’ve built a nest egg that they don’t want to lose to a stupid lawsuit after a former student does something stupid in an airplane and the next of kin feel the instructor is responsible.

See the common denominator?
 
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