1. This site uses cookies. By continuing to use this site, you are agreeing to our use of cookies. Learn More.

Paying for school? Please help!

Discussion in 'Collegiate Aviation' started by Evanmac3332, Dec 28, 2010.

  1. Evanmac3332

    Evanmac3332 New Member

    Joined:
    Dec 13, 2010
    Messages:
    25
    Likes Received:
    0
    Ok. So here is my predicament. I want to attend college for a commercial pilots license while earning a bachelors degree. I do not qualify for enough money from FAFSA and I do not qualify for a subsidized loan due to my parents income. I can not get a loan because my mom will not co-sign due to the risks if the loan is defaulted. I will not give up and I can't give up. This has been my dream. I will not give up on it. Does anyone know how else I can pay for this education? Any kind of program where I can work and fly at the same time?! I live in Austin, Texas and I am willing to move. I am serious, I will try anything!

    Does anyone have any ideas!!??? I worked my ass of in Highschool with a GPA of 3.72 and a freshman college GPA of 4.0.

    I have the smarts. I have the grades. I have the passion. I don't have the money.

    Any help anyone can offer would be great. Thanks in advance for any help
     
  2. Minuteman

    Minuteman “Dongola”

    Joined:
    May 16, 2003
    Messages:
    6,823
    Likes Received:
    2,468
    Welp, the good news is that you're close to a bunch of good universities and FBOs in Central Texas. The better news is that you don't have to go to the same place to study for a bachelor's degree and get your ratings.

    My story is that I was butt-ass poor all through school and didn't take my first flight until a couple of years out of school and paid for it on an as-you-go basis. Graduating with debt sucks, and you might learn you like another way of making a living during the four years you're at school (not being slaved to an aviation program gives you more options in life).
     
  3. USMCmech

    USMCmech Well-Known Member

    Joined:
    May 3, 2004
    Messages:
    4,852
    Likes Received:
    1,824
    Trade your Uncle Sam 4 years in return for money for college.

    Bonus is that you get to sped 4 years growing up, gain real world work experiance, and you have a steady paycheck the whole time you can spend on your private pilot certificate.
     
  4. Evanmac3332

    Evanmac3332 New Member

    Joined:
    Dec 13, 2010
    Messages:
    25
    Likes Received:
    0
    Well I want to fly for commercial aviation. Would you say the airforce is a good option?
     
  5. USMCmech

    USMCmech Well-Known Member

    Joined:
    May 3, 2004
    Messages:
    4,852
    Likes Received:
    1,824
    I was refering to enlisting, and useing the GI Bill. All 4 branches have the GI Bill, which you can use anywhere after you get out. I'm not sure about the Coast Guard, but I think it does too.

    If you want to research ROTC and possibly flying for the military, that is a posibility too. But only a fraction of those guys wind up as pilots.

    You can try to get into an aviation related job in the military which can help you earn a mechaincs airframe and powerplant liscense. Having an A&P isn't a requirement, but it can defiately help.
     
  6. C-182 flyer

    C-182 flyer Well-Known Member

    Joined:
    Nov 26, 2010
    Messages:
    153
    Likes Received:
    32
    I would suggest looking into ROTC scholarships. Your tuition and books would be covered and you get a small stipend in addition. The first two years have no risk, if you do not like it, you can walk. Another option if you get some credits under your belt before you decide what you want to do, look into the BDCP program in a few years.

    Obviously you have to pay back the government, so going into a field other than pilot will have a five year obligation (I think) and if you become a pilot, it will be more than double that. If you were considering enlisting to get the GI Bill, think hard about seeking a ROTC scholarship because in about the same amount of time, you will be in nearly the same place career wise. (4 years of school plus 5 year officer commitment non-pilot vs. 4 years enlisted plus 4 years of school) In the mean time you will receive better pay, leadership opportunities, etc.

    Flying for the military introduces many variables in itself. Every branch has aircraft, and each branch is vastly different. As well as within each branch, the different communities vary as well. Depending on which branch and which airframe, you will have different mentalities, commitments, deployment cycles, missions, lifestyles, etc.

    I met some ROTC students doing the aviation programs at their schools, and they indicated their flight training was covered by their scholarships, and they had not even selected their designators yet. Oklahoma comes to mind, but I am not sure. Also, flying in the military is not all about building hours to get you to the airlines, (maybe in some communities it is) so be prepared to have a non flying job and remember that your first commitment is to the service, not setting yourself up for an airline career. You will also find that many military pilots may initially have had the desire to fly for an airline when they joined, but have no desire to take the pay cut and live the lifestyle that the airlines now offer by the time their obligation is up. Not to mention, one of the only pensions around anymore is a military retirement and the flying would become very dull, straight and level at one g.

    Despite the path you choose, do your research and do not rush into anything.

    Disclainer:
    I did OCS, and that was a while ago, so follow up on any advice I give about ROTC or BDCP.
     
  7. Maddog1974

    Maddog1974 Well-Known Member

    Joined:
    Jan 26, 2008
    Messages:
    519
    Likes Received:
    3
    I agree with the suggestion to enter the military. The reasons and plans can be many but if I could go back and tell myself what to do it would be to get my certificates while in the Military. Once you leave the military in four years or so you will have the GI bill and be considered financially independent. If you are really motivated you could get the flight training AND go to night school all while being in the military. It might take all four years to get to Commercial/ CFI but IMHO it would be worth it. If you could finish sooner and then teach on the weekends then you would be rolling along quite nicely once out of the military.

    Then, go to college and teach/fly while there, utilizing the GI Bill, and once finished with college roll into a full time aviation job. Just make sure you get a good degree that can build on or supplement you when aviation gets tough. This route will allow you to see the industry and achieve your goals while getting money for college.

    The only side note about the military is that you may need to have permission to do the flight training during your enlistment. Deployments are no big deal, you may kjust have to pick up where you left off when you return to a US assignment.

    Good luck!!
     
  8. Fencer

    Fencer Experimentalist

    Joined:
    May 10, 2010
    Messages:
    1,402
    Likes Received:
    1,921
    Or you can go old fashioned way. Get a job. Work couple three years while earning your CFI at local FBO. Avoid loans as plagues.
     
  9. Derg

    Derg Naval Intelligence, MCRN Staff Member

    Joined:
    Dec 31, 1969
    Messages:
    32,595
    Likes Received:
    43,684
    Technically, plagues aren't that avoidable. Otherwise they would be plagues! :). :sarcasm:
     
  10. drunkenbeagle

    drunkenbeagle Gang Member

    Joined:
    Mar 18, 2009
    Messages:
    7,322
    Likes Received:
    2,862
    I went to school on an AFROTC scholarship, feel free to PM me with any questions.

    While it may not necessarily work out that you fly as an Air Force pilot, private flying is encouraged and they will pay for some of it. An Air Force officer easily makes enough to pay for all of the training you would need for an aviation career, but keep in mind - the airlines may seem less attractive than the military in 10 years time...
     
  11. erictgill

    erictgill Well-Known Member

    Joined:
    May 1, 2010
    Messages:
    61
    Likes Received:
    0
    I would say all branches are a good option. Steady paycheck and excellent benfits while your active duty and as a veteran. I did 4 1/2 years active in the Army and my sole intention of joinning the service was education money. A few years after I joined the Post 9/11 GI Bill was passed and it really made education affordable.

    I start school next month
    - tuition PAID (36 months of full time education or 4 years if you dont take summer classes)
    - Flight Fees PAID
    - Books are PAID
    - Monthly housing allowance PAID each month
    - Texas residents get a good deal on top of the post 9/11 GI Bill. The Hazlewood Act!

    I wouldnt recommend doing much school while your active duty, unless you have a stable work schedule. I started an online course and sure enough a week after classes start I am sent to California for a month stuck in the mojave desert with nothing.
    I start School next month at a community college in Houston - im working towards my Associates Degree and after that I plan on transfering to a University to work towards a degree in a different field.
     
  12. sparky

    sparky New Member

    Joined:
    Apr 23, 2010
    Messages:
    73
    Likes Received:
    0
    with a 3.72 high school and 4.0 freshman college gpa you should have no problem securing scholarships. I can only assume you haven't applied for them, so is there any reason you haven't? with a 3.72 high school and a commitment to community service, you would of been guaranteed a full scholarship. You've got to remember it takes more then good grades to secure your share of the scholarship money that's available, since you are competing against a huge pool of well rounded applicants, the more complete your resume and the more involved you are in activities within your community the better your chances.

    The single biggest problem with students failing to secure scholarships is their lack of motivation in applying for the funds. Millions go unclaimed each year, followed by millions going to students who didn't meet "all" the scholarship requirements, yet just happened to be the only applicant which resulted in them being awarded the funds.

    Since your already in college, I assume your aware that you've already missed the majority of the aviation industry scholarship deadlines for fall 2011.
     
  13. Autothrust Blue

    Autothrust Blue "We cannot afford it."

    Joined:
    Aug 3, 2010
    Messages:
    16,708
    Likes Received:
    9,746
    Agree with above regarding scholarships, there's a lot of money out there that goes unclaimed. Even here at Small State University there are a ton of scholarships we offer.

    :yeahthat:

    I understand the desire to study aviation. Believe me, I do...there's nothing I'd rather do than fly. Fortunately, I'm not married to the job. It's a good thing considering how the industry outlook seems to fluctuate anytime oil goes either direction, or when the world economy farts.

    If you are going to study aviation at a college, I'd strongly recommend being in the military. A friend of mine was Purdue NROTC, she's now Pensacola-based and flying rotorwing (some form of personality defect, I assume... :D ). She has a flying job, good benefits, and school paid for.

    If you can afford to pay as you go and study something besides aviation, you'll have the best of both worlds: your ratings, and a job you can do when the inevitable furlough/economic slump/other calamity happens.
     
  14. twotwowoo

    twotwowoo New Member

    Joined:
    Aug 12, 2007
    Messages:
    1,061
    Likes Received:
    0
    I was in your exact same situation in college. I gave up on aviation. I'm not saying you have to give up, just saying the odds are stacked against you. You can join the military, but I wouldn't recommend that in the current political climate. You can try for scholarships.

    Whatever you do, don't take the approach of "I'll put aviation on the back burner and then come back to it after school." You won't come back. I speak from experience - I had that same approach, and it didn't work out. Once you graduate, your primary focus will be survival, and you'll take whatever job is available. A mid-life career change is far more difficult, especially if you have a family.

    If you really want this thing, then look at other options of getting there. If not, then seek another career path. Personally, I'm happy I didn't end up as a pilot - it was wrong for me and I was wrong for it. Your mileage may vary. Do some "soul-searching" and make that decision.
     
  15. highspeed

    highspeed Well-Known Member

    Joined:
    Sep 14, 2001
    Messages:
    617
    Likes Received:
    29
    IIRC everyone can get the stafford sub loan. If you declare yourself an "independent student" you can get the un-sub as well. DO NOT get a private student loan (ie Sallie Mae etc), thank your mom for not co-signing. It'll take you an eternity to pay it off, can't be gotten rid of in bankruptcy, and will bleed you dry. I know from experience how daunting they can be.

    Apply for scholarships, plus both Stafford loans. See what that total is and find a school that works within that budget. There is at least one community college I know of that has a flight program and I'd bet there are more. I went to school FT, worked FT, and kept a flight sked and stayed within the budget. When I xfer'd to ERAU that all went out the window. Stay in the budget and you can fly and enjoy it as a living.
     
  16. bunk22

    bunk22 Well-Known Member

    Joined:
    Oct 16, 2008
    Messages:
    3,124
    Likes Received:
    2,042
    I second and/or third what was said above, fly military. Hook up with a ROTC program, then maybe flight school and everything is paid for. Not a bad deal really.
     
  17. Gmata

    Gmata Well-Known Member

    Joined:
    Apr 11, 2011
    Messages:
    27
    Likes Received:
    4
    I enlisted in the Airforce in 2004 i was in for 6 years in an aviation related job ( C-17 Aircrew member) i traveled all over the world and got paid a ton of money, you can easily make enough to pay for your ratings at the Aeroclub on base, most bases do. Then when you get out you can use your Post 911 GI bill benefits to go to school for free. That includes a 4 year bachelor degree FREE, books FREE, and Housing allowance while you are going to school. ( around $1300 a month). I am getting ready to go to school next month i wished i would've done some more flying while i was in, but i am going for an aviation degree so all my flying will be paid for anyways.

    Good luck and if you have any questions, let me know!
     
  18. Austin_Marshall

    Austin_Marshall New Member

    Joined:
    Dec 30, 2015
    Messages:
    22
    Likes Received:
    0
    Thanks for the listing.
    On follow up my studies, There are many options to get help for institutional expenses. As you have good grades for you, scholarships are one of the financial support provided by many aviation colleges.
     

Share This Page