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Night carrier landing, E-2C Hawkeye....

Discussion in 'General Topics' started by bunk22, Mar 10, 2017.

  1. bunk22

    bunk22 Well-Known Member

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    The only order I could think of is CAG Paddles, then AIRLANT Paddles (east coast), AIRPAC (west coast) and CNATRA Paddles.
     
  2. MikeD

    MikeD Administrator Staff Member

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    Is it "Force Paddles?"
     
  3. MikeD

    MikeD Administrator Staff Member

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    Royal Navy 892 Naval Air Squadron F-4K Phantom recovering aboard the USS Nimitz (CVN-68) a few months after the commissioning of that aircraft carrier in 1975. Looks like a 2-wire.

    [​IMG]
     
  4. bunk22

    bunk22 Well-Known Member

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    Force Paddles is part of the names above....

    CNAL Force LSO (AIRLANT) LCDR Andrew “Toe” Gastrell Comm: 757-322-3318 Andrew.gastrell@navy.mil
    CNAP Force LSO (AIRPAC) LCDR Robert “Flamer” Heater Comm: 619-545-1155 Robert.heater@navy.mil
     
  5. bunk22

    bunk22 Well-Known Member

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    Two pics of me landing, day time in calm seas....

    [​IMG]

    This was my last COD trap from the left seat, in great conditions, Oct 2006. My next trap was flying T45C Goshawks years later, April 2012 and they would be my final traps in the USN.
    [​IMG]

    Never recalled taking night photo's, just to busy...
     
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  6. obx

    obx Well-Known Member

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    Thanks, guys, for the insight into a part of Naval Aviation that I knew nothing about.
     
  7. MikeD

    MikeD Administrator Staff Member

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    Is VRC assigned to the boat, as in belongs to the CAG, have your own ready room and such? Or are you guys visitors to the boat as well as other carriers too?
     
  8. ///AMG

    ///AMG Well-Known Member

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    I'm sure bunk can speak more intelligently on the subject, but there are 2 squadrons, VRC-30 (North Island based) and VRC-40 (Norfolk based). Each has detachments to a carrier for deployment…….ie east coast airwings will generally have a -40 det. For the most part they live on the beach and fly out several times a day. Only major caveat to that is during the TRANSLANT/TRANSPAC where they will fly their handful of birds aboard to cross the pond. From there, they are living in fancy condos collecting per diem, and only occasionally spending the night on the boat (i.e. airplane breaks). Bunk was in a generation where night traps were a thing for the COD and I believe they may have accordingly had a more persistent presence in the wardroom/staterooms/someone's ready room, but that hasn't been the case for a while now. Not exactly sure why.
     
  9. bunk22

    bunk22 Well-Known Member

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    This. When I started with VRC-30, we were doing a trial thing, living on the boat, flying day and night. How I got the majority of my left seat night traps, then I was one of a few night qualed CQ IPs at the FRS. As far as VRC-30, we always had our own ready room, kept a small 8-10 man detachment on the boat when we were store based. We flew nights at the boat from 97-2000 with DET 5 flying nights all the way to 2004 or so.

    Anyway, as AMG knows, day time, good weather boat landings and cat shots rock. Some of the most fun you can have with your pants on. It starts to change with weather and at night, just not a fan. I am of the opinion, carrier landings aren't what natural great pilots do because I'm not a natural, not great, just a pilot. It is training, training, training and when you're done training, you'll do some more. I believe we could (the Navy) could get 90% of the pilots on this forum to land successful on the boat, day time. Maybe 75-80% at night.
     
    Last edited: Mar 13, 2017
  10. kaudbron

    kaudbron Well-Known Member

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    Is this something where NVGs would be beneficial, or not so much? IE whats the major difference day vs night besides the obvious?
    The most difficult approach and landings in the Herc world in my opinion are to an AMP-4 (Unlit) LZ with low illumination. We typically have a 500' zone on the 3,000' long runway that we are aiming for so obiviously a bigger aim point then you are going for. On a side note got to land at Bogue Field recently to pick up our user, didn't think to ask them to turn on the meatball until our last departure.
     
  11. ahw01

    ahw01 Well-Known Member

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  12. JEP

    JEP What are you looking at? Staff Member

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    So you were always bringing the mail and assorted goodies...? Thank You...... Those were the fun planes to watch. They always seemed to sink off the flight deck when departing. I dont know how it actually felt, but it sure looked like they dipped down a bit..
     
  13. bunk22

    bunk22 Well-Known Member

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    Pretty much....except when we did night stuff, it was always just a launch and recovery to stay current. Always empty.
     
  14. scoobs

    scoobs Well-Known Member

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    Even with LASIK?

    Sent from my Moto G (4) using Tapatalk
     
  15. ///AMG

    ///AMG Well-Known Member

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    No NVGs authorized/certified for shipboard traps. So not so much.

    Agree with bunk, you can teach the skill to the majority of pilots, the way people wash out is taking too long for the lightbulb to go on (whether that be CQ or any other phase of training). I'm by no means gifted or really above average, I've just worked and studied hard over the years, and have been lucky to live to learn from my many mistakes. Others are not so lucky
     
  16. kaudbron

    kaudbron Well-Known Member

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    Interesting... is it a G limitation? it seems like it would be useful?
     
  17. ///AMG

    ///AMG Well-Known Member

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    If in the down and locked position, current generation goggles wouldn't pop off under any sort of load you would encounter during an arrested landing, especially since those loads would be almost entirely pure forward deceleration. One big issue is that you don't really have any depth perception when looking through NVGs, and they also pretty heavily restrict your visual field of regard…..think of looking through a big soda straw. The other issue would be their degraded performance with visible moisture in the air, as well as the fact that you can get some pretty significant washout from bright lights. The flight deck is pretty dim, but I don't know what things would look like through NVG's if they were gained down significantly due to atmospheric moisture/precipitation, a common environment during shipboard operations. I will say that other services conduct NVG approaches/landings to shore fields at least. I think some of the next gen NVD's may be removing this restriction however.
     
  18. ozziecat35

    ozziecat35 4 out of 5 great lakes prefer Michigan.

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    At the time LASIK wasn't authorized for WOFT (2006'ish). It wasn't that so much as something called refract that wasn't waiverable. So, I ended up going MI and getting into one of the smallest MOS's in the Army. Opened a lot of doors for me, so I can't play the regret/what if game.
     
  19. bunk22

    bunk22 Well-Known Member

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    I like that video and at around 3:21 in the video, I see the Buccaner is flying the ball from the stbd side of the boat. US carriers have 3 psitions for the lens, including the right side but I never saw it and thus never flew it. I have seen the two postions on the port....err, left side.
     
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  20. Alt-Right

    Alt-Right Active Member

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    Here's a Stoof doing it with the original setup on the starboard side of the LA. Aboard USS Antietam CVS-36.

    [​IMG]
     
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